Continuing Education Courses

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Acupuncture

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

Aging and Disorders of Communication

Description

The ancient Chinese healing practice of acupuncture has been used for thousands of years to treat many ailments, especially pain. Today, this therapy that addresses disharmony in the body, mind, and spirit is widely practiced throughout China and is used by millions of individuals in the United States and many other countries. This course explores the history of acupuncture, the theories involved in its practice (including yin and yang, qi, the meridian system, and causes of disharmony), the types and benefits of acupuncture, as well as possible complications and contraindications of the therapy and training issues.

Objectives

  1. Describe the key historical developments related to acupuncture.
  2. Explain yin and yang theory.
  3. Discuss the energetic concept of qi.
  4. Describe the meridian system.
  5. Discuss causes of disharmony.
  6. Describe types of acupuncture.
  7. Identify the health benefits of acupuncture.
  8. List possible complications and contraindications of acupuncture.
  9. Identify training issues related to acupuncturists.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is an increasingly common neurodevelopmental disorder of childhood. It is usually first diagnosed in childhood and often lasts into adulthood. Children with ADHD have trouble paying attention, focusing, controlling impulsive behaviors, or they may be overly active.

Objectives

  1. Describe the extent of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the United States.
  2. Discuss the signs and symptoms of ADHD.
  3. Identify the potential causes and risk factors for ADHD.
  4. Explain the issues related to diagnosing ADHD.
  5. Describe the treatment options for ADHD, including pharmacological, psychotherapy, and education.
  6. Discuss integrative therapies for ADHD.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Communication links all human beings together. As individuals age, their ability to perceive information through their senses is often distorted or impaired. Age-related sensory changes impact the quality of life and the quality of communication. This course provides the health care professional with an overview of the types of speech and hearing disorders that affect communication in aging adults and discusses the role of the health care provider in detecting and preventing communication disorders.

Objectives

  1. Describe disorders of vocal abuse and misuse.
  2. Describe symptoms of vocal cord paralysis.
  3. Describe a common fluency problem.
  4. State the two main types of aphasias.
  5. Differentiate between Wernicke’s aphasia, anomic aphasia, Broca’s aphasia, and global aphasia.
  6. List ways for family members to communicate effectively with the aphasic individual.
  7. Describe the process of hearing.
  8. Identify causes of hearing loss.
  9. Describe types of hearing loss.
  10. Describe other causes of communication disorders, including traumatic brain injuries, cerebrovascular accidents, and environmental injuries due to noise.
  11. Examine several types of effective interventions used for individuals with communication disorders, including augmentation and alternative communication, sign language, assistive listening devices, cochlear implants, and adult aural rehabilitation.
  12. State the role of the health care provider in the detection and prevention of communication disorders.

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2.10 Hours | 0.21 AOTA CEUs

$21.00

Alzheimer's Disease: Mysteries and Possibilities

Animal-Assisted Therapy

Anxiety Disorders: An Integrative Approach

Description

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a condition in which the concept of loss is central - the loss of one’s memories, independence, the ability to recognize loved ones, and the loss of dignity. Often referred to as “the long goodbye,” AD is the most common type of dementia, affecting approximately millions of Americans. It is responsible for billions of dollars annually in health care costs. However, new research is providing hope for those with Alzheimer’s disease as well as for their families and caregivers. This course provides health care professionals with an overview of the various types of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. Signs and symptoms of the disease, methods of diagnosis, aspects of care and treatment, caregiver issues, integrative health considerations, as well as implications for the future of this disease are discussed.

Objectives

  1. Describe the incidence and impact of Alzheimer’s disease on national and global health.
  2. Identify the key milestones in the history of Alzheimer’s disease.
  3. Explain the aspects of brain anatomy and physiology as it relates to Alzheimer’s disease.
  4. Differentiate between normal brain changes that occur with aging and those changes associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  5. Explain the causes of Alzheimer’s disease.
  6. Differentiate between the effects of Alzheimer’s disease on the various areas of the brain.
  7. Identify risk factors associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  8. Explain the stages of Alzheimer’s disease.
  9. Differentiate between Alzheimer’s disease and depression.
  10. Identify characteristics of common types of dementia.
  11. Explain key methods used to diagnose Alzheimer’s disease.
  12. Describe basic elements of care for the person with Alzheimer’s disease.
  13. Explain methods to effectively manage behavior in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease.
  14. Identify possible integrative therapies that may affect the development or behaviors associated with Alzheimer’s disease.
  15. Identify caregiver issues related to Alzheimer’s disease.
  16. Describe possible stress management options for caregivers.
  17. State current research initiatives and findings in Alzheimer’s disease

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4.00 Hours | 0.40 AOTA CEUs

$40.00

Description

Animals have been a part of our lives as long as we have been on the planet. The health benefits of the human-animal bond are far reaching. From guide dogs, to watching fish in an aquarium, to swimming with dolphins, animals provide us with companionship, assistance, exercise, a sense of calmness, sensory stimulation, and a level of acceptance that is often difficult to find from any other source. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the history and purpose of animal-assisted therapy, to describe the theoretical background of the therapy, to explore the benefits of this type of therapy for humans, to examine several common types of animal-assisted therapy, and to review guidelines for developing an animal-assisted therapy program.

Objectives

  1. Describe the history of animal-assisted therapy.
  2. State the purpose of animal-assisted therapy programs and differentiate between the types of therapy animals.
  3. Describe three theories that attempt to explain the therapeutic effects of human interactions with companion animals.
  4. State the settings in which animal-assisted therapy is utilized.
  5. List at least three benefits of animal-assisted therapy.
  6. Identify four types of animals used in animal-assisted therapy.
  7. State guidelines for animal-assisted therapy programs.
  8. Describe the role of the health care provider relative to the human-animal connection

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Anxiety disorders are the most common, and frequently occurring, mental disorders. Anxiety is manifested by disturbances of mood, as well as of thinking, behavior, and physiological activity. The five major types of anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social phobia disorder (or social anxiety disorder), and panic disorder. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the types of anxiety disorders, describe conventional treatment modalities for these disorders, and examine integrative treatment approaches for anxiety disorders.

Objectives

  1. Describe the extent of anxiety disorders in the United States.
  2. Examine the pathophysiology of anxiety.
  3. Describe generalized anxiety disorder.
  4. Describe obsessive-compulsive disorder.
  5. Describe post-traumatic stress disorder.
  6. Describe social phobia disorder.
  7. Describe panic disorder.
  8. Discuss the differential diagnoses for anxiety disorders.
  9. Compare the types of conventional treatment approaches to anxiety.
  10. Examine the types of integrative treatment approaches to anxiety

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Applying Recent Changes From the DSM-5

Aromatherapy: The Healing Power Of Scent

Ayurvedic Medicine: Ancient Foundations of Health Care

Description

Mental illness is a major public health issue in the United States, affecting an estimated 25% of all adults each year. This is approximately 60 million individuals. The lifetime prevalence of mental illness is even higher with approximately 50% of all adults will develop a mental illness at some time during their lives.

Despite the availability of diagnostic criteria, accurate recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of mental illnesses remains challenging. The most current edition of the DSM, the fifth revision (DSM-5), was released in 2013 after a 14 year international collaborative process to identify gaps in the DSM-IV nosology and diagnostic criteria, and to revise the diagnostic criteria and classification system accordingly. The overall goal of the DSM-5 was to address the limitations of the DSM-IV and incorporate the most recent clinical and scientific data on the empirical basis of psychiatric disorders, with the objective of providing the best patient care and improving usability by clinicians

Objectives

  1. Identify some specific key differences between the DSM-IV and DSM-5.
  2. Explain how to appropriately apply the diagnosis of major depressive disorder accurately in patients who may or may not be experiencing a recent bereavement.
  3. Discuss why the “anxious distress” specifier might be added to any diagnosis of major depressive disorder.
  4. Describe collaborative care strategies as well as referral strategies to ensure that patients with conversion disorder receive effective treatment.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Description

Aromatherapy is a complementary and alternative, holistic, and integrative therapy that uses essential oils to promote both physical and psychological health. It is often used in conjunction with massage, meditation, and other therapies to achieve healing. Aromatherapy has gained in popularity in recent years, and clinical aromatherapy (the use of specific essential oils for the prevention and treatment of health conditions) is being incorporated into treatment plans by naturopathic physicians, medical doctors, registered nurses, licensed massage therapists, and licensed acupuncturists as well as other health care providers.

Objectives

  1. Define aromatherapy.
  2. Describe the historical use of fragrance and aromatherapy for healing.
  3. Describe how essential oils are absorbed into the body.
  4. Examine methods of essential oil extraction.
  5. Describe methods of essential oil application.
  6. Describe the clinical effects of essential oils using a body systems approach.
  7. Examine evidence-based clinical research regarding the use of aromatherapy for specific conditions.
  8. Discuss safety issues and contraindications in aromatherapy use.
  9. Discuss training and education for aromatherapists.
  10. Describe the key elements of some of the most common essential oil monographs.

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Description

Ayurvedic medicine is a highly sophisticated religion, philosophy, and system of medicine that has been practiced in India for over 2,500 years. As with other forms of complementary and alternative medicine, it focuses on the whole individual and one’s relationship to one’s environment. Health, vitality, and longevity are achieved through a balance within the body and between the body and the external environment. This course will provide an overview of the concepts and philosophies of Ayurveda and examine the relationship between harmony and health.

Objectives

  1. Define Ayurveda and describe the origins of Ayurvedic medicine.
  2. Explain the five elements of Ayurveda.
  3. Describe the tridoshas.
  4. Explain the relationship of the tridoshas to an individual’s characteristics and health.
  5. Describe the three gunas.
  6. Identify the roles of the seven dhatus.
  7. Identify the roles of the three malas.
  8. Define ojas and their roles.
  9. Describe agni and srotas.
  10. Describe the three causes of disease according to Ayurvedic medicine.
  11. State the six stages of the disease process in Ayurvedic medicine.
  12. Describe the diagnostic techniques used by the Ayurvedic practitioner.
  13. Explain the treatment modalities used in Ayurvedic medicine and the importance of their timing when utilized.
  14. Explain the educational standards related to Ayurvedic medicine practitioners in the United States today.

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3.00 Hours | 0.30 AOTA CEUs

$30.00

Bipolar Disorder in Children and Adolescents

Botanicals, Herbs, and Herbalism

Caregiving at the End of Life - Issues and Considerations

Description

It is sometimes difficult to determine if a child or adolescent is going through a “phase” or showing signs of a more serious psychiatric challenge such as bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder causes unusual shifts in moods and energy. These shifts are different from the normal “ups and downs” that every child or teenager goes through from time to time. Children and adolescents with bipolar disorder can suffer from damaged relationships, substance abuse, poor school performance, and even commit suicide. However, today there are more treatment options available than ever before for children and adolescents with this disorder.

Objectives

  1. Define the term bipolar disorder.
  2. Discuss the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder.
  3. Differentiate between the adolescent symptoms of mania and depression.
  4. Describe adolescent behavioral changes associated with the symptoms of mania and depression.
  5. Examine the risk factors associated with bipolar disorder.
  6. Differentiate between the four types of bipolar disorder.
  7. Discuss conditions that often co-exist with bipolar disorder in children and adolescents.
  8. Discuss behavioral, social, and financial issues associated with bipolar disorder.
  9. List differential diagnoses often misdiagnosed as bipolar disorder.
  10. Discuss current research findings related to bipolar disorder.
  11. Describe traditional treatment options for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder.
  12. Describe integrative treatment options for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

While modern medicine has produced many scientific advances, one of the most important “advances” has been the recognition of the value of herbs and herbalism. After all, nature and plants have been an essential part of everyday life since the beginning of recorded history. Used for medicine, clothing, food, and in religious ceremonies, in many health belief systems, plants are considered a gift of nature and valued for their healing effects.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of herbs and herbalism in health care.
  2. Explain the herbal production process.
  3. Describe the levels of herbalists.
  4. Identify the actions of herbs.
  5. Describe the key concerns of herbalism today.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Caregivers are individuals who provide care to an individual who needs assistance. Caregivers can be professionals but are often unpaid individuals who support a loved one through an illness or the last phase of life. The experience can be immensely gratifying and rewarding as well as challenging and stressful. By anticipating the demands of end-of-life, caregiving can shift the journey to one in which support focuses on acceptance and healing.

Objectives

  1. Describe key caregiver issues.
  2. Identify ethical principles of caregiving.
  3. Explain patient rights.
  4. Explain behavioral, nutritional, and safety issues of caregiving.
  5. Discuss integrative health methods of supporting caregiver well-being.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Centenarians: Keys to Longevity

Characteristics of Spirituality

Childbirth And Culture

Description

Living to be 100 years old was once considered a rare occurrence, but with advancements in medicine and lifestyle changes, living to be 100 is not so improbable today. As a group, there are more centenarians worldwide than ever before, with the largest population found in America. The people living in these “Blue Zones™” have achieved longevity through different paths and different cultures. The goal of this course is to describe the epidemiology and psychosocial dynamics of centenarians, examine genetic factors that contribute to longevity, and discuss the nine lessons learned from the Blue Zones.

Objectives

  1. Describe the epidemiology of centenarians.
  2. Examine genetic and environmental factors that contribute to longevity.
  3. Discuss the importance of telomeres and aging.
  4. Describe the psychosocial dynamics of centenarians.
  5. Describe the low incidence of dementia in centenarians.
  6. Discuss the lessons learned from the Blue Zones of Sardinia, Italy; Okinawa, Japan; Loma Linda, California; Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica; and Ikaria, Greece.
  7. Identify factors that have contributed to the avoidance of heart disease, cancer, stroke, and diabetes in the Blue Zones.
  8. Examine nine lessons learned from the Blue Zones.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

While theorists and researchers have yet to agree on a single, universally accepted theory or definition of spirituality, few would deny its existence or impact on health and healing. Spirituality has a profound impact on health and it is important for health care providers to understand this impact. This course will examine the theories of spirituality, its many definitions, and essential elements will be discussed. The stages of spiritual development and the connection between spirituality and healing will also be described.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the spiritual dimension.
  2. Explain theories of spirituality.
  3. Compare the definitions of spirituality.
  4. Describe the essential elements of spirituality.
  5. Describe the connection between spirituality and healing.
  6. Discuss the concept of integral spirituality.
  7. Examine states and stages of consciousness.
  8. Describe Western worldviews.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

An intimate and complex experience, childbirth reflects a woman’s biology as well as the social context in which delivery takes place. The experience of every woman is unique to her and deeply personal because of the culture in which she gives birth and the culture with which she identifies herself. Today’s health-care professional must provide a level of care that meets the guidelines of cultural competence and respects different cultural values and belief systems to assure that patients will be truly cared for in a holistic way that advocates for them appropriately, thoughtfully, and sensitively.

Objectives

  1. Define “culture.”
  2. Describe the elements of culture that may impact the childbearing woman and her family.
  3. Explain the role of culture on the childbearing process.
  4. Discuss cultural differences related to beliefs about family, procreation, pregnancy, and infertility.
  5. Compare and contrast various cultural beliefs and practices related to diet and nutrition, birth attendants, birth gender, pain management, breastfeeding, postpartum care, and infant care.
  6. Discuss the stages of cultural competence.
  7. Describe methods of improving cultural competence.

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2.00 Hours

$20.00

Choosing the Business Structure for your Health and Wellness Business

Chronic Pain: An Integrative Approach to Effective Pain Management

Color and Health - Exploring the Connection

Description

Innovations in health care directed toward improved health outcomes, the utilization of more varied diagnostic and holistic treatment options, and the increasing diversity of patient populations supports health care providers and other interested individuals who are seeking unique career alternatives, including starting their own business. Once an individual decides to create their own business, one of the first important an important first steps is to decide how that business will be structured. This decision can impact the longevity and success of the business and has important legal and tax implications.

Objectives

  1. List the six basic types of business structures.
  2. Describe the characteristics of each type of structure.
  3. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of each business structure.
  4. Describe tax considerations for the various types of business structures.
  5. Explain the important considerations for selecting a business name.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Pain interferes with the enjoyment of life. It makes it difficult to work, socialize with friends and family, sleep, and accomplish activities of daily living. It may reduce productivity and create financial hardships in terms of lost work and high medical bills. Chronic pain can lead to a loss of appetite, depression, and physical weakness as well as a loss of the joy of life. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of pain and pain management, including the scope of the issue, key historical events in pain management, the physiology of pain, types of pain, conventional pharmacological treatments for pain, and integrative approaches to pain management.

Objectives

  1. Describe the scope of pain and chronic pain in the United States.
  2. Identify key events in the history of pain management.
  3. Define pain and chronic pain.
  4. Explain the physiology of pain.
  5. Describe the types of pain.
  6. Identify various pain behaviors.
  7. Compare and contrast the various pharmacological methods for managing pain.
  8. Compare and contrast the various integrative therapies useful in pain management.

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Description

The use of color in healing has a long history. A fundamental aspect of environmental design, color has also been linked to physical, psychological, and social reactions in all of its uses. Color’s characteristics can influence how it is used and what effects it might produce.

Objectives

  1. Explain the brief history of the use of color in healing.
  2. Describe the characteristics of color.
  3. Compare and contrast the two most common color systems.
  4. Discuss the impact of color.
  5. Identify the healing effects of color.
  6. Describe the types of color therapy.
  7. Explain guidelines for the use of color in healing environments.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Creating a Business Plan for Your Health and Wellness Business

Creating Healing Relationships

Cultural Competence in Health Care

Description

Your business plan will provide you with a description of your business, help you understand start-up and ongoing costs, persuade others to invest in what you are creating, help you successfully compete in your target market, and support you as you assess the opportunities and challenges you may face with your new enterprise. By creating a business plan and doing your homework, you hold yourself accountable to goals and objectives, and greatly improve your chance of success.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of a business plan in the success of a business.
  2. List the elements of a business plan.
  3. Explain the characteristics and functions of the elements of a business plan.
  4. Identify exit strategies available to businesses.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

A healing relationship involves two major elements: a relationship with the self (intrapersonal relationship) and relationships with others (interpersonal relationships). Each is critical to creating a healing environment for an organization’s staff and clients. Healing relationships support the social, spiritual, psychological, physical, and behavioral components of people and the organization. These relationships stimulate the healing abilities inherent in patients/clients, employees, and families. Optimal healing environments support and enhance the intentions, health behaviors, treatments, and buildings of all who share the space.

Objectives

  1. Compare the intrapersonal and interpersonal environments of the person providing care.
  2. Describe the elements of intrapersonal relationships that support healing relationships.
  3. Identify the elements of the C.A.R.I.N.G. model of self-care.
  4. Explain the role of balance and thriving in healing relationships.
  5. Describe the three dimensions of a healing presence.
  6. Describe the characteristics of a healing presence.
  7. Identify the components of a healing interpersonal relationship.
  8. Explain the role of the health care provider in creating a healing environment for clients.
  9. Describe the key principles of relationship-centered care (RCC).

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

The culturally diverse health care populations in the United States provide health care professionals with tremendous opportunities to bridge cultural gaps, incorporate new treatments and disease prevention strategies into their practices, and learn about different cultural values and cultural belief systems. The goal of this course is to provide health care professionals with an overview of specific cultural characteristics of major cultural groups in the United States; explore the relationship between language, culture, and health care; identify health beliefs and health care systems; describe cultural competence; and identify specific culturally competent practices.

Objectives

  1. Describe specific characteristics about the composition, cultural aspects, and unique health care issues concerning African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and American Indians/Alaskan Natives.
  2. Explain the meaning of language and culture.
  3. Explain the relationship between culture and health care
  4. Identify major health belief systems.
  5. Identify major health care systems.
  6. Define cultural competence and explain why it is important in the delivery of health care.
  7. Identify The Joint Commission’s cultural, religious, and spiritual guidelines for assessment and treatment of patients.
  8. List guidelines for achieving cultural competence.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Cultural Considerations at the End of Life

Curanderismo and Central and South American Healing Practices

Current Issues in Nutrition

Description

At the end of life, attitudes about the loss of a loved one profoundly affect how both a dying person and his or her family and friends address the dying and the grieving processes. Diverse populations in the United States provide health-care professionals with tremendous opportunities to bridge cultural gaps and learn about different values and religious and spiritual belief systems.

Objectives

  1. Identify cultural competence challenges at end of life.
  2. Discuss cultural differences in response to death and dying.
  3. Describe specific cultural considerations at the end of life for African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indian/Alaskan Natives, and Muslim Americans.
  4. Differentiate between specific cultural issues for each cultural group.
  5. Describe the influence of culture on funeral and burial practices.
  6. Describe the influence of religion and spirituality on funeral and burial practices.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Description

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of curanderismo and the healing practices of Central and South America as a way of supporting the important cultural and spiritual elements of those who use this medicine system.

Objectives

  1. Describe the historical roots of curanderismo.
  2. Identify reasons for the resurgence of this form of traditional healing.
  3. Discuss the basic elements, healing practices, and common diagnoses used in curanderismo.
  4. Explain the role of peyote in traditional Central and South American healing practices.

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2.00 Hours

$20.00

Description

Our diet has a profound impact on our health and well-being, yet many of us are not aware of where our food originated. We eat toxic, irradiated, or genetically altered foods, and we eat more than we need. How can we change our eating habits and become more conscious of what we eat, why we eat it, and how it is prepared.

Objectives

  1. Identify the various toxins in our food chain, including pesticides, growth hormones, and food additives.
  2. Describe the effects of irradiation, genetically altered foods, and food allergies.
  3. Explain the health issues surrounding plastics and food.
  4. Describe the types and functions of nutraceuticals.
  5. Discuss the role of supplements in our diet.
  6. Define organic farming components.
  7. Explain how food and global warming are related.

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Death and Dying

Depression: An Integrative Approach

Diabetes in Pregnancy

Description

What is grief? What are normal grief responses? What is involved in the final life transition—death? These are some of the questions that will be discussed in this course. The role of culture, palliative and hospice care, advance directives, and the role of spirituality in death and dying will be described. Interactions, healing strategies, and rituals that use the senses and bring comfort and peace for the dying will also be explored.

Objectives

  1. Describe the grieving process.
  2. Identify psychological responses, physical symptoms, social changes, and spiritual aspects of normal grief responses.
  3. Describe the role of cultural and ethnic traditions in the grieving process.
  4. Explain the psychologic, spiritual, social, and physical aspects of the process of dying for older adults.
  5. Explain the purpose of advance directives.
  6. Define and describe palliative care.
  7. Identify and describe aspects of hospice care.
  8. Differentiate between hospice and palliative care.
  9. List the advantages and disadvantages of dying at home.
  10. List interactions and healing strategies for the dying.
  11. Describe the use of the senses in rituals for the dying.
  12. Examine spiritual dimensions of death and dying.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Depression is one of the most serious and costly health care problems facing the United States today. It is one of the most common types of mental disorders. Depression interferes with an individual’s daily life, normal functioning, and may cause emotional pain for the individual with the disorder and family and friends. Although depression is a common but serious mental illness, with treatment depressive symptoms can be alleviated.

Objectives

  1. Differentiate between the different forms of depressive disorders.
  2. Discuss the pathophysiology of depression.
  3. Compare gender and age differences in depression.
  4. Describe the relationship between sleep and depression.
  5. Identify the symptoms of depression.
  6. Describe the criteria for diagnosis of depression.
  7. Identify the differential diagnoses of depressive disorders.
  8. Examine conventional treatment approaches for depression.
  9. Examine integrative treatment approaches for depression.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Diabetes during pregnancy can provide a special challenge to the patient and her health care providers. The effects of poorly controlled blood glucose levels can result in life-threatening effects for both the mother and the fetus. This course provides an overview of the signs, symptoms, and treatment of diabetes during pregnancy.

Objectives

  1. Define diabetes and identify its scope in the United States.
  2. Identify the major health impacts of diabetes.
  3. Explain the role of hormones and other body chemicals on insulin production.
  4. Briefly describe the pathophysiology of diabetes.
  5. Identify the five main types of diabetes and describe their major characteristics.
  6. Describe the metabolic changes that occur in a normal pregnancy.
  7. Identify maternal complications from diabetes.
  8. Identify fetal and neonatal effects of diabetes.
  9. Describe the major characteristics of pregestational diabetes.
  10. Identify White's main classifications of diabetes in pregnancy.
  11. Identify key components of screening and treatment for the patient with GDM.
  12. Describe general management techniques for the pregnant woman with diabetes, including diet, exercise, and medication therapies.
  13. Identify tests used to assess placental function and fetal well-being.
  14. Describe major management issues for the pregnant woman during the intrapartum, labor and delivery, and postpartum periods.
  15. Describe new therapies for the pregnant woman with diabetes, including oral hypoglycemic agents, insulin pump therapy, and islet cell transplantation.

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3.00 Hours

$30.00

Ectopic Pregnancy

Elder Abuse

End-of-Life Issues: Death, Dying, and Grief

Description

Ectopic pregnancies are a gynecological emergency that can seriously affect a woman’s health and fertility. However, new developments in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition have resulted in greatly improved maternal mortality and morbidity rates. The health-care provider is key to patient education, early assessment and diagnosis, and the proper treatment of this serious condition.

Objectives

  1. Identify the extent of ectopic pregnancies in North America.
  2. State predisposing factors associated with ectopic pregnancy.
  3. Describe the signs and symptoms related to ectopic pregnancy.
  4. Explain various diagnostic procedures related to ectopic pregnancy.
  5. Describe intervention options for women with ectopic pregnancy.

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2.00 Hours

$20.00

Description

Caregivers must often cope with stressful economic and personal burdens when caring for the elderly who pay the price for this stress and may be abused, exploited, or neglected. This course provides health care professionals with an understanding of the causes and types of elder abuse; professional responsibilities related to reporting, documenting, and intervening in cases of suspected abuse; and action steps to prevent elder abuse.

Objectives

  1. Describe the prevalence of elder abuse in the United States.
  2. Define elder abuse.
  3. Describe the three categories of elder abuse.
  4. Describe the six types of elder abuse, including the signs and symptoms of each type.
  5. State the health care provider’s responsibility for assessing, documenting, and reporting suspected cases of elder abuse.
  6. State the professional and legal issues relevant to the health care provider and elder abuse.
  7. Describe actions that can be taken to prevent elder abuse.

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2.10 Hours | 0.21 AOTA CEUs

$21.00

Description

The dying experience is a profound, individual experience. The experience of loss and grief are as individual and unique as the persons involved. During this time, people often raise questions about the meaning of life. This course provides health care professionals with an understanding of the spiritual, psychological, social, and physical aspects of the dying experience; the nature of care and the needs of the dying; supportive aspects of care for the dying; the grieving process; healing from grief and loss; and cultural differences in response to death and grief.

Objectives

  1. Explain the spiritual, psychological, social, and physical aspects of the process of dying.
  2. Discuss the needs of caregivers and the needs of individuals at the end of life.
  3. List interactions and healing strategies for the dying.
  4. Describe the use of the senses in rituals used at the end of life.
  5. List the advantages and disadvantages of dying at home.
  6. Identify signs and symptoms of imminent death.
  7. Describe the grieving process.
  8. Identify psychological responses, physical symptoms, social changes, and spiritual aspects of normal grief responses.
  9. Explain grief and the healing process.
  10. Describe cultural differences in response to death and grief.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

End-of-Life Issues: Hospice and Palliative Care

End-of-Life Issues: Pain Assessment and Management

End-of-Life Issues: Physiologic Changes at the End of Life

Description

Using a multidisciplinary team approach, the primary goals of hospice and palliative care are to provide symptom control, psychosocial and spiritual care, and optimal quality of life. The role of hospice and palliative care is rapidly expanding due to a better understanding of end-of-life issues by health care professionals. This course provides nurses and health care professionals with an overview of end-of-life issues in hospice and palliative care, including the specific characteristics of hospice and palliative care and the similarities and differences in hospice and palliative care for both adults and children.

Objectives

  1. Define hospice care and the services it provides.
  2. Explain the management of pain and nonpain symptoms.
  3. Define palliative care.
  4. Describe palliative care services for the seriously ill.
  5. List important aspects of palliative care from the patient’s perspective.
  6. Discuss the similarities and differences of hospice and palliative care.
  7. Describe issues related to providing quality end-of-life care.
  8. Examine goals of care for the dying patient.
  9. Describe holistic palliative care for the dying child.

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Description

Pain assessment and management are especially important for high-quality end-of-life care. To provide quality care to individuals at this stage of their lives, health care practitioners must be particularly skilled at assessing pain, understanding misconceptions of pain management, addressing cultural issues in pain management, and providing effective pain therapies. This course provides health care providers with an overview of pain assessment and management for patients of all ages during their end-of-life care, including cultural considerations and pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic management techniques.

Objectives

  1. Define pain.
  2. Describe how pain affects the individual at end-of-life.
  3. State common misconceptions and facts about pain.
  4. Explain the pathophysiology of pain.
  5. Identify the various types of pain.
  6. Describe pain behaviors.
  7. Explain the influence of culture on expressions of pain and on pain management.
  8. Identify the key elements of pain assessment.
  9. Describe barriers to effective pain management.
  10. Describe key terms and the key elements of pharmacologic pain management
  11. Describe key elements of nonpharmacologic pain management.
  12. Describe the special considerations involved in treating a patient with a current or past history of substance abuse.
  13. Describe the special considerations involved in managing escalating, severe pain.
  14. Identify special issues related to end-of-life care and the pediatric patient.

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3.50 Hours | 0.35 AOTA CEUs

$35.00

Description

For health care professionals to provide compassionate, quality care to patients at the end of life, they must understand the many changes the patient undergoes. Holistic end-of-life care provides relief, comfort, and support whenever possible. It involves a comprehensive approach to the physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual aspects of the individual. This course examines one specific aspect of holistic end-of-life care: the physiologic changes in body systems associated with the end of life. Guidelines for the care of specific physical symptoms at the end of life will also be presented.

Objectives

  1. Describe major physiologic changes at the end of life related to the cardiovascular system.
  2. Describe major physiologic changes at the end of life related to the gastrointestinal system.
  3. Describe major physiologic changes at the end of life related to the nervous system.
  4. Describe end-of-life changes in the respiratory system.
  5. Describe end-of-life changes in the renal system.
  6. Describe end-of-life changes associated with malignancies.
  7. Explain the end-of-life changes that occur with HIV/AIDS.
  8. Describe clinical care guidelines for specific conditions at the end of life, including ascites, cachexia, and anorexia.
  9. Describe clinical care guidelines for the end-of-life conditions of constipation and diarrhea.
  10. Describe clinical care guidelines for the end-of-life conditions of cough and fatigue.
  11. Describe clinical care guidelines for the end-of-life conditions of nausea and vomiting.

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3.50 Hours | 0.35 AOTA CEUs

$35.00

End-of-Life Issues: Ethical Issues

Energy Healing

Ethical and Legal Issues in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Description

End-of-life care presents health care professionals with many ethical challenges and dilemmas. Understanding ethical theories and ethical principles can provide a foundation for decision making. This course provides health care professionals with the tools necessary to make ethical decisions when providing care for patients at the end of their lives. Key ethical issues related to end-of-life care, including advance directives, euthanasia, medical futility, do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders, pain management, terminal hydration, organ donation, and considerations for the neonatal and pediatric patient are examined. In addition, guidelines for dealing with ethical dilemmas are also provided.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of ethics in end-of-life care in health care today.
  2. Define ethics.
  3. Describe the key elements of the ethical theories of utilitarianism, deontology, Ross’s ethics, natural law ethics, ethical egoism, and virtue ethics.
  4. Describe the key ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, veracity, confidentiality, justice, and fidelity.
  5. Outline a method for analyzing ethical dilemmas.
  6. State the relationship between culture and ethics.
  7. Define brain death.
  8. List key items from the Dying Patient’s Bill of Rights.
  9. Describe two types of advance directives and explain their purpose.
  10. Define euthanasia and compare active versus passive euthanasia.
  11. Compare involuntary active euthanasia with voluntary active euthanasia.
  12. Describe assisted suicide and medical futility.
  13. List important considerations relevant to do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders.
  14. Define terminal sedation and describe how and why it is utilized.
  15. Define the double effect.
  16. Describe considerations for the health care provider relevant to the voluntary refusal of hydration and nutrition.
  17. Describe issues related to the removal of mechanical ventilation and organ donation.
  18. Identify key issues related to end-of-life care of the neonatal and pediatric patient.

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3.50 Hours | 0.35 AOTA CEUs

$35.00

Description

With mounting scientific evidence now supporting the efficacy of ancient healing systems, the health care community is combining traditional methods of energy healing with modern medicine. This course will provide an overview of the types of energy and practices used in energy healing.

Objectives

  1. Describe the types of energy.
  2. Explain the universal energy field (UEF).
  3. Explain the human energy field (HEF).
  4. Describe the seven auric layers.
  5. Describe the seven chakras.
  6. Define the concept of energy healing.
  7. Describe various types of energy healing.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

There has been a dramatic rise in the use and acceptance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in the United States. However, many legal and ethical issues remain unresolved surrounding provider oversight, inconsistent legislative mandates regarding definitions about standards of care and scope of practice, liability issues for providers and organizations, and lack of knowledge about CAM therapies. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the major issues facing biomedical providers and providers of CAM therapies. Biomedicine, the rise of CAM and integrative medicine, ethical issues, legal concerns, malpractice and liability issues, and third-party reimbursement factors that affect CAM providers are discussed.

Objectives

  1. Describe the factors contributing to the rise in complementary and alternative medicine in the United States.
  2. Explain the characteristics of CAM therapies.
  3. Identify key events contributing to the rise of biomedicine and provider regulation
  4. Differentiate between key ethical theories.
  5. Compare and contrast the elements of ethical principles
  6. Identify the relationship between culture and ethics.
  7. Describe state law issues relating to the regulation of medical and CAM providers.
  8. Describe key elements of the credentialing process for physicians and CAM providers.
  9. Describe liability issues for health care organizations.
  10. Explain the relationship between CAM therapies and health literacy, health freedom, and access to treatment.
  11. Identify key issues related to herbal medicine and dietary supplements in patient care
  12. Identify key issues related to referrals to CAM providers.
  13. Identify essential elements in the disciplinary process for health care providers.
  14. Describe third-party reimbursement issues related to CAM therapies.
  15. Define “willing provider laws.”
  16. Explain key issues related to reimbursement, health care fraud, and experimental or medically unnecessary treatments.

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3.00 Hours | 0.30 AOTA CEUs

$30.00

Ethical Issues in Complementary and Alternative Medicine

Financing Your Business in Health and Wellness

Food and Health: An Introduction

Description

There has been a dramatic rise in the use and acceptance of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in the United States. However, there are ethical issues that remain unresolved surrounding provider oversight, inconsistent legislative mandates regarding definitions about standards of care and scope of practice, liability issues for providers and organizations, and lack of knowledge about CAM therapies.

Objectives

  1. Describe the factors contributing to the rise in complementary and alternative medicine in the United States.
  2. Explain the characteristics of CAM therapies.
  3. Identify key events contributing to the rise of biomedicine and provider regulation.
  4. Differentiate between key ethical theories and principles.
  5. Examine the ethical issues related to CAM therapies.
  6. Identify the relationship between culture and ethics.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Creating a successful business means understanding the world of finance. Though this world is often intimidating, financial literacy is a critical skill for entrepreneurs. Many businesses fail because of a lack of adequate funding, so this remains one of the biggest challenges faced by entrepreneurs when starting, operating, and expanding their business. Understanding your business’ financing needs and knowing the range of financing options available to you will improve your odds of success.

Objectives

  1. Describe the types of startup costs and essential expenses needed by a business.
  2. Identify key factors to consider when determining funding needs of a business.
  3. Compare and contrast the key financial statements (balance sheet, income statement, and cash flow analysis).
  4. Explain the purpose of assumption sheets and breakeven analyses.
  5. Discuss common types of financing.
  6. Explain key investment ratios used in business.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

What we eat profoundly affects our health and well-being, yet many of us eat when we are rushed; we don’t understand how various food elements interact, and we are not as knowledgeable as we could be about various diet types and their effects on our health. This course provides an overview of the role of food and health in human history, describes the elements of nutrition, and examines some of the most common types of diets.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of food and health in human history.
  2. Define diet and nutrition.
  3. Identify the macronutrients and their role in nutrition and health.
  4. Identify the micronutrients and their role in nutrition and health.
  5. Describe the key features and focus of high-fiber, high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets and the Atkins diet.
  6. Describe the key features and focus of moderate-fat, balanced nutrient, reduction diets; the raw food diet; and vegetarian and vegan diets.
  7. Describe the key features and focus of the elimination and anti-inflammatory diets.

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1.60 Hours | 0.16 AOTA CEUs

$16.00

Food Labels—Deciphering The Mysteries

Global Healing Systems-An Introduction

Happiness and Health: Thriving in Stressful Times

Description

An important element of health is the ability to understand what is in the food we eat. Knowing how to read and understand food labels can help individuals make healthier food choices. Many consumers do not fully understand what the labels on their food means in terms of nutritional value or the way the food was produced, raised, and manufactured. With this knowledge, understanding the labels becomes easier and making healthy choices are the result.

Objectives

  1. Describe how to read a Nutrition Fact label.
  2. Explain what food claims mean in terms of nutritional value.
  3. Define what organic means.
  4. Explain the four organic principles.
  5. Identify various food labels and their significance to food products.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Global healing traditions have a long and rich history that dates back thousands of years. Reflecting the specific and unique characteristics of the culture, history, philosophy, and availability of resources in different parts of the world, these traditional healing systems provide the primary form of health care for the majority of the world’s population.

Objectives

  1. Describe the foundation and prevalence of traditional healing systems.
  2. Compare and contrast traditional healing philosophies with those of conventional medicine.
  3. Discuss the differences in becoming a traditional healer versus a conventional medicine healer
  4. Identify the need for collaboration and integration between allopathic and traditional forms of healing.

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1.00 Hours

$10.00

Description

Everyone wants to be happy and healthy. By focusing on becoming happier, research suggests that you will not only feel better, but also have increased energy, improved immune function, increased creativity, improved relationships, and increased productivity. Happiness also leads to a healthier, longer life. This course will examine the health benefits of happiness and provide suggestions for engaging in activities that increase health and happiness.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the varied definitions of happiness.
  2. List the health benefits of being happy.
  3. Describe the factors that determine happiness.
  4. Describe the characteristics of the people who are happy.
  5. Differentiate between the role of genetics versus personal accountability in determining happiness.
  6. Examine the practices studied by the National Institutes of Health that increase happiness and health.

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1.40 Hours | 0.14 AOTA CEUs

$14.00

Healing Effects of Physical Activity and Movement

Healing Elements of Meditation

Health and the Human Spirit

Description

Physical activity and movement are essential elements of any program designed for obtaining or maintaining health and well-being. While most individuals associate physical activity with aerobics, many activities comprise a well-rounded and interesting physical fitness and movement program. This course will examine the physical and psychological effects of physical activity and movement and describe ways to help initiate a fitness/movement program.

Objectives

  1. Describe the types of physical activity.
  2. Explain the four factors of an exercise program.
  3. Explain the physiological benefits of physical activity and movement.
  4. Identify the risks of exercise.
  5. Explain the psychological benefits of physical activity and movement.
  6. Describe the mechanics of breathing.
  7. Explain the philosophical basis of yoga.
  8. Identify the categories of yoga.
  9. Explain the origins and philosophical basis of Tai Chi Chuan.
  10. Describe the principles and concepts of Tai Chi Chuan.
  11. Explain the benefits of Tai Chi Chuan.
  12. Describe important steps in initiating a physical activity program.

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3.00 Hours | 0.30 AOTA CEUs

$30.00

Description

Although there are many ways to meditate and many different forms of meditation, they all share the characteristic of intentionally training a person’s attention and concentration. Meditation practices are used by diverse cultures, are rooted in the traditions of the great religions, and have been practiced for thousands of years to promote healing. This course explores the practice of meditation and describes the various types of meditation.

Objectives

  1. Describe the practice of meditation.
  2. Discuss the various meditation traditions.
  3. Describe meditation techniques, including breathing meditation, Transcendental Meditation, mindfulness meditation, and concentration meditation.
  4. Describe walking and moving meditation, medical meditation, and meditating using visualization.
  5. Describe meditating with sound and receptive and creative meditation.
  6. List the physiological benefits of meditation.
  7. List the psychological benefits of meditation.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Spirituality plays an important role in health and healing. This course will explore the forms and expressions of spirituality; discuss culture and its relationship to spirituality; examine the relationship between spirituality and aging; explain spiritual interests within the health care system; describe the role of spiritual care providers in administering spiritual care; and describe the relationship between spirituality and health conditions, therapeutic interventions, and healing environments.

Objectives

  1. Examine definitions of spirituality.
  2. Discuss theories of spirituality.
  3. Examine the connection between spirituality and health.
  4. Describe the spiritually healing processes of mystery, love, suffering, hope, forgiveness, peacemaking, and grace.
  5. Identify areas of research on spirituality, religion, and health.
  6. Describe various spiritual rituals.
  7. Discuss spirituality and the aging population.
  8. Describe six spiritual areas of interest within the health care system.
  9. Describe the role of spiritual care providers in administering spiritual care.
  10. Explain the elements of a spiritual assessment and healing intervention.

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Health Effects of Meditation

Healthy Aging

Healthy Lifestyles

Description

Meditation is a mind-body practice with many methods and variations that are all grounded in the silence and stillness of present-moment awareness. Evidence of meditation’s health effects has been well documented: the practice offers improvement in the symptoms of various disease conditions in addition to the experience of a deeper spiritual connection.

Objectives

  1. Define meditation.
  2. Describe the various anatomical functions of the brain.
  3. Compare the characteristics of the four main electromagnetic brain waves.
  4. Differentiate between methods of practicing meditation.
  5. Describe the physiological effects of meditation.
  6. Describe the psychological effects of meditation.
  7. Discuss the effects of meditation on specific health conditions.
  8. Explain contraindications to meditation.
  9. Identify guidelines for practicing meditation.
  10. Describe considerations before starting a meditation practice.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

This course is designed to introduce the health professional to a broad, conceptually integrated perspective on the topic of healthy aging. This course discusses healthy aging as it relates to cultural similarities and differences, complementary and alternative medicine, nutritional concerns, physical activity, fall prevention, sleep issues, sexuality concerns, social activities, and spirituality.

Objectives

  1. Describe the demographics of the diverse, aging population.
  2. Compare the differences and similarities of health profiles of four groups of ethnic elderly populations.
  3. Describe examples of complementary and alternative therapies used by the older adult.
  4. Discuss nutritional concerns for the elderly.
  5. Examine the benefits of physical activity and healthy aging.
  6. List risk factors and prevention strategies for falls by the elderly.
  7. Identify sleep concerns of the older adult.
  8. Discuss the effects of aging on sexuality.
  9. Describe the positive effects of social activity on aging.
  10. Examine the influence of religion and spirituality on the lives of older adults.

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2.10 Hours | 0.21 AOTA CEUs

$21.00

Description

Individuals’ lifestyles can have a powerful impact on the health of their body and mind. The brain is affected by virtually every aspect of their life including their levels of stress, the foods they choose to eat, the amount and type of physical activity in which they engage, whether or not they abuse drugs, and whether or not they regularly spend time in nature.

Objectives

  1. Examine the effects of stress on the brain.
  2. Describe the impact of nutrition on brain health.
  3. Discuss how physical activity affects the brain.
  4. Explain the impact of substance abuse on the brain.
  5. Describe the role of nature in brain health.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Herbs and Herbalism

HIV/AIDS Education for Healthcare Professionals

HIV/AIDS Education for Kentucky Health Care Professionals

Description

While modern medicine has produced many “scientific advances” one of the most important advances has been the recognition of the value of herbs and herbalism. Nature and plants, in particular, have been an essential part of everyday life since the beginning of recorded history. Used for medicine, clothing, food, and in religious ceremonies, plants are considered a gift of nature and valued for their healing effects by many health belief systems. This course provides an examination of the role of herbs and herbalists, herb processing, how herbalists are trained, and issues facing the use of herbs.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of herbs and herbalism in health care.
  2. Explain the herbal production process.
  3. Describe the levels of herbalists.
  4. Identify the actions of herbs.
  5. Describe the key concerns of herbalism today.

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1.60 Hours | 0.16 AOTA CEUs

$16.00

Description

Since they were first described in 1981, more than a quarter of a century ago, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remain a persistent and widespread threat to the health, well-being, and human potential of individuals in the United States and across the globe. Causing fear, guilt, and accusations, weakening the immune system and potentially leading to numerous infections, cancers, or death, HIV and AIDS remain international health issues. They require that health care providers be knowledgeable about the complex clinical aspects of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, as well as address ethical, cultural, and empowerment issues, and implement evolving infection control guidelines.

Objectives

  1. Describe the basic epidemiological and medical information about HIV/AIDS.
  2. Identify risk behaviors that contribute to the transmission of HIV/AIDS.
  3. Relate the stages of HIV/AIDS (including oral manifestations) to the diseases and conditions they can cause.
  4. Describe opportunistic diseases that define HIV/AIDS.
  5. Explain the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Opt-Out Testing Recommendations.
  6. Explain methods of HIV transmission and strategies for prevention.
  7. Explain how to effectively use a male and female condom.
  8. Describe current recognized methods of testing.
  9. Describe current recognized methods of treatment.
  10. Summarize the elements of effective HIV management in the workplace, including post exposure management.
  11. Explain the professional, ethical, and legal standards that apply to a caregiver of an individual with HIV/AIDS.
  12. Appraise the appropriate behaviors and attitudes of caregivers toward persons living with HIV/AIDS.

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2.30 Hours | 0.23 AOTA CEUs

$23.00

Description

Since they were first described in 1981, more than a quarter of a century ago, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remain a persistent and widespread threat to the health, well-being, and human potential of individuals in the United States and across the globe. Causing fear, guilt, and accusations, weakening the immune system and potentially leading to numerous infections, cancers, or death, HIV and AIDS remain international health issues. They require that health care providers be knowledgeable about the complex clinical aspects of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases, as well as address ethical, cultural, and empowerment issues, and implement evolving infection control guidelines.

Objectives

  1. Describe the basic epidemiological and medical information about HIV/AIDS.
  2. Identify risk behaviors that contribute to the transmission of HIV/AIDS.
  3. Relate the stages of HIV/AIDS (including oral manifestations) to the diseases and conditions they can cause.
  4. Describe opportunistic diseases that define HIV/AIDS.
  5. Explain the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Opt-Out Testing Recommendations.
  6. Explain methods of HIV transmission and strategies for prevention.
  7. Explain how to effectively use a male and female condom.
  8. Describe current recognized methods of testing.
  9. Describe current recognized methods of treatment.
  10. Summarize the elements of effective HIV management in the workplace, including post exposure management.
  11. Explain the professional, ethical, and legal standards that apply to a caregiver of an individual with HIV/AIDS
  12. Appraise the appropriate behaviors and attitudes of caregivers toward persons living with HIV/AIDS.
  13. Relate the comprehensive health and human services for those living with HIV that are available in the state of Kentucky.

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Holistic and Integrative Health: An Introduction

Holistic Stress Management

How Safe Is Your Water?

Description

The past several decades have brought tremendous growth in the numbers of health care facilities and providers offering integrative health care training and services. Consumers in the United States use these complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in greater numbers than ever before. Why is this occurring? How do integrative medicine and traditional medicine differ in their approach to care from conventional Western medicine? What integrative health care practices do practitioners and patients use?

Objectives

  1. Define complementary medicine, alternative medicine, integrative medicine, and integrative health.
  2. Describe how extensively integrative therapies are used in the United States today.
  3. Examine the defining principles of integrative health care.
  4. Describe the history of the development of integrative health care.
  5. Describe the four criteria of conventional Western medicine.
  6. Describe the shared elements of complementary and alternative medicine and integrative medicine.
  7. Examine the profound shifts in culture, science, technology, and communication that shaped the philosophy of complementary and alternative medicine.
  8. Describe elements of success for health care organizations that want to incorporate integrative health into their range of provided services.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

There are many holistic stress management techniques including self-awareness, cognitive restructuring, effective communication, guided imagery, social support, art therapy, and journaling. This course describes the stress response and explores holistic stress management techniques.

Objectives

  1. Describe the concept of stress.
  2. Identify the stages of the general adaptation syndrome (GAS).
  3. Describe types of stress.
  4. Explain the role of stress on the individual.
  5. Describe the physiology of stress.
  6. Explain the concept of psychoneuroimmunology.
  7. Identify the ways self-awareness can help an individual manage stress.
  8. Describe the roles of cognitive restructuring and effective communication in stress management.
  9. Explain the role of imagery in stress management.
  10. Describe the impact of social support on health.
  11. Describe art therapy and its role in stress management.
  12. Explain how journaling impacts health and can address stress.

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3.00 Hours | 0.30 AOTA CEUs

$30.00

Description

Health care professionals play an important role in preventing waterborne illness and in educating the public about potential health risks related to exposure to microbial and chemical contaminants in their drinking water. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the scope of the issue of water safety, and the information health care providers need to know to effectively educate the public about their water and their health.

Objectives

  1. Describe the scope of global water safety issues.
  2. Identify types of common water contaminants.
  3. Identify common water-related diseases and the places they are commonly found.
  4. List how to prevent recreational water illnesses (RWIs).
  5. Describe the elements of a consumer confidence report addressing water quality.
  6. Explain the processes used to disinfect drinking water.
  7. Describe ways to prevent water contamination.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Humor and Health

Hyperemesis Gravidarum

Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy

Description

How many times have you felt better after laughing? Humor and laughter make people feel alive and bring a unique perspective to life. They relieve stress and connect people to one another. Humor is a complex phenomenon and an essential part of human nature. Anthropologists have never found a culture or society that did not have humor as a part of it. This course examines humor and its effects on health as well as exploring ways to incorporate humor into one’s personal and professional life.

Objectives

  1. Explain the historical perspective of humor.
  2. Identify the role of humor in medieval physiology.
  3. Define humor, laughter, play, and gelotology.
  4. Explain when inappropriate laughter might occur.
  5. Describe the four components of humor.
  6. Describe the types of humor.
  7. Explain the theories of humor.
  8. Describe the philosophical, psychoanalytical, psychological, anthropological, and sociological perspectives of humor.
  9. Identify the myths about humor and laughter.
  10. Describe the psychological effects of humor.
  11. Describe the physiological effects of humor.
  12. Describe pathological laughter.
  13. Explain the relationship between humor and stress.
  14. Explain the use of humor in health care, including the use of therapeutic humor.
  15. Identify the four senses of humor.
  16. Describe ways to develop a sense of humor.

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3.50 Hours | 0.35 AOTA CEUs

$35.00

Description

Hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition affecting thousands of pregnant women each year. More severe than morning sickness, HG can affect every aspect of a woman’s life. With early recognition and treatment, however, this condition can be effectively managed.

Objectives

  1. Define hyperemesis gravidarum.
  2. Identify the epidemiology of hyperemesis gravidarum.
  3. Describe the maternal and fetal effects of hyperemesis gravidarum.
  4. Compare hyperemesis gravidarum with morning sickness.
  5. Identify theories of etiology of hyperemesis gravidarum.
  6. List risk factors and differential diagnoses of this syndrome.
  7. Discuss clinical work-up procedures useful in diagnosing hyperemesis gravidarum.
  8. Explain pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment options for women with hyperemesis gravidarum.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy (previously called pregnancy-induced hypertension or PIH) are complex and serious conditions of pregnancy, which, if untreated or improperly treated, can result in maternal and fetal complications including death. This course provides health care professionals with information about the pathophysiology of these conditions as well as the classifications of the disease and the recommended treatment modalities in order to provide safe and effective care.

Objectives

  1. Describe the incidence and history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
  2. List the risk factors for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
  3. Describe the pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
  4. List maternal and fetal complications of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
  5. List the symptoms of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
  6. State the classifications of hypertension in pregnancy.
  7. Describe the nursing management of the patient with preeclampsia, eclampsia, gestational hypertension, and chronic hypertension.
  8. Describe the medications used to treat hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
  9. Explain the HELLP syndrome and its treatment.

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2.50 Hours

$25.00

Influenza: Symptoms, Treatment, and Prevention

Intimacy, Sexuality, and Healthy Aging

Introduction to Gerontology

Description

Influenza (commonly called the “flu”) is a highly contagious respiratory disease that strikes all ages and can cause significant illness and death. Striking hundreds of thousands of individuals worldwide every year, this disease can be prevented using a combination of techniques. This course will review influenza virus symptoms, treatment, and prevention methods.

Objectives

  1. Describe the types of influenza and how influenza changes over time.
  2. Describe the clinical issues related to H1N1 (“swine flu”).
  3. Identify the clinical issues related to avian influenza.
  4. Explain the methods of transmission and clinical symptoms of the influenza virus.
  5. List methods of diagnosis for influenza.
  6. Describe methods of prevention and control measure for influenza.
  7. Explain the clinical considerations of vaccination for influenza.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Loving and being loved are essential to maintaining a positive, healthy attitude toward life. Quality of life is often related to affection and tenderness shared with loved ones. With a healthy self-esteem and a willingness to communicate with one's partner, older adults can enjoy intimate relationships throughout their lives.

Objectives

  1. Describe the importance of intimacy and sexual needs in healthy aging adults.
  2. Discuss normal changes affecting sexuality in the older adult.
  3. Explain sexuality issues in the healthy aging female.
  4. Explain sexuality issues in the healthy aging male.
  5. Describe pathological conditions affecting sexuality in the older adult.
  6. Discuss chronic illnesses that can affect sexual functioning in the older adult.
  7. Describe lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender sexual issues in the older adult.
  8. Examine emergent issues in sexuality and healthy aging.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Opportunities are unlimited for the individual who knows the field of gerontology. Demographic changes and changes in health care have influenced the development of a variety of gerontologic roles. This course will provide a broad overview of the field of gerontology and discuss the characteristics of older adults, the sociology of aging, theories of aging, stereotypes and ageism, physiological and psychological changes of aging, mental health, wellness and aging, and complementary and alternative health care methods that may benefit the older adult.

Objectives

  1. Describe major characteristics and demographics of older adults.
  2. Discuss changing social views on aging.
  3. Define terms such as ageism, myth, stereotype, attitude, prejudice, and discrimination.
  4. Describe the major stereotypes that reflect negative prejudice and result in discrimination toward older adults.
  5. Describe obstacles to health care for older adults as a result of negative attitudes of health care professionals.
  6. Describe strategies to reduce ageism.
  7. Identify and discuss theories of aging.
  8. Describe the factors related to mental health and aging.
  9. Describe the dimensions of wellness in the older adult.
  10. Identify risk factors for malnutrition in the older adult.
  11. List the benefits of physical activity for the older adult.
  12. Identify important screening tests and immunizations for older adults.
  13. Examine types of complementary and alternative health care methods that may benefit the older adult.

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2.40 Hours | 0.24 AOTA CEUs

$24.00

Journaling: Healthy Living Through Self-Discovery

Light, Health, and Healing

Description

Writing has been an important part of the human experience for centuries but has only recently been recognized as a therapeutic tool for healing. Used to document personal and historical events, describe emotions and feelings, reduce stress, and explore creativity, journaling allows individuals to develop a deeply personal relationship with themselves.

Objectives

  1. Define journaling.
  2. Explain the purpose of journal writing.
  3. Identify the health benefits of journaling.
  4. Describe journal writing styles and themes.
  5. Discuss tips for successful journal writing.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

As we increasingly focus on improving the design of health-care environments, it is only natural to examine the role of light in those environments. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the characteristics of light, compare and contrast the types of light, examine the role of light in sight and our overall health, examine circadian rhythms, explore the therapeutic benefits of light, and describe how to incorporate light into healing environments.

Objectives

  1. Describe the characteristics of light.
  2. Compare and contrast the types of light.
  3. Explain the role of light in the process of sight.
  4. Identify the major anatomical and physiological elements of the human eye.
  5. Explain the role of circadian rhythms in health.
  6. Describe the therapeutic benefits of light.
  7. Explain light therapy and its role in health.
  8. Describe how to incorporate light into healing environments.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Manual Bodywork Healing Therapies

Marketing Your Health and Wellness Business

Medication Errors

Description

Touch is one of the most primal needs of any human being. Manual bodywork healing therapies address the need for human touch, enhance health, and heal the body, mind, and spirit. Health care is evolving and integrating the worlds of alternative and allopathic practitioners, and these therapies are being integrated along with conventional health care in hospitals, nursing homes, hospice centers, and other health care facilities.

Objectives

  1. Describe the benefits of therapeutic massage.
  2. Explain the somatic and musculoskeletal therapies of therapeutic massage, Swedish massage, rhythmical massage, sports massage, hot stone massage, neuromuscular massage, and Aston patterning.
  3. Describe the Eastern, meridian-based, and point therapies of acupressure, shiatsu, Jin Shin Jyutsu, and reflexology.
  4. Discuss the energy-based therapies of Reiki, Therapeutic Touch, and Healing Touch.
  5. Explain the emotional bodywork therapies of Rolfing and Hellerwork.
  6. Describe the manipulative therapies of osteopathy and craniosacral therapy.
  7. Identify the cautions and contraindications for manual bodywork healing therapies.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

An effective, well-developed marketing strategy is one of the most important documents you will create in your business. This document communicates what customers receive from your company and helps secure customers for the future. Marketing strategies take time, resources, and money to implement. Since all three are often in limited supply (especially for new companies), an effective marketing strategy must be carefully and thoughtfully designed and measured.

Objectives

  1. Describe the purpose of marketing for business success.
  2. Explain the difference between marketing and sales.
  3. Discuss effective ways to conduct market research.
  4. Describe the four Ps and five Fs of marketing
  5. Identify ways to define a target market.
  6. Describe the characteristics of the product profile and product life cycle.
  7. Compare and contrast various marketing vehicles and marketing tactics
  8. Discuss issues to consider when marketing on the Internet.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Medications promote healing, reduce suffering, and contribute to modern medical miracles. However, because thousands of new drugs have been developed recently, because the health care environment is increasingly complex, and because patients are older and often sicker, there is increasing risk for medication errors. This course will review the issues relevant to medication errors and provide guidelines for prevention.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the contribution of the current health care system to the increase in medical and medication errors.
  2. Describe the scope of the problem.
  3. Describe the major causes of medication errors.
  4. Describe four types of medication errors.
  5. Explain the role of the incident report and its analysis in determining the causes of medication errors.
  6. List the four stages of drug ordering and delivery and describe the unique issues related to each stage.
  7. Describe the guidelines for preventing errors during each of the four stages (prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration).
  8. Describe the medication reconciliation process.
  9. Explain Root Cause Analysis (RCA) and its role in error identification and prevention.
  10. Identify and explain possible solutions to the problem of medication errors, including advances in technology, standardized bar codes, the use of ward-based clinical pharmacists, and patient education.
  11. Explain the impact of cultural diversity on medication safety.

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3.00 Hours

$30.00

Meditation and Brain Health

Meditation and Religious Traditions

Meditation Types and Practices

Description

Meditation is a mind-body practice with many methods and variations that are all based on the silence and stillness of present-moment awareness. Exciting research is showing that a regular practice of meditation causes physical changes in the brain that can be beneficial to mental and physical health. Meditation can also change the way the brain functions.

Objectives

  1. Explain the effects of meditation on the brain.
  2. Describe the effects of meditation on brain waves.
  3. Identify types and techniques of meditation that enhance brain health.
  4. Describe the physiological effects of the regular practice of meditation.
  5. Describe the psychological effects of the regular practice of meditation.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Although there are many ways to meditate and many different forms of meditation, they all share a unifying characteristic: each one focuses on intentionally training a person’s attention and concentration. Meditation practices are used by diverse cultures to promote healing, are rooted in the traditions of the great religions, and have been practiced for thousands of years. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the meditation practices in the religious traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Sufism.

Objectives

  1. List the common elements in most types of meditation.
  2. Identify the physiological and psychological benefits of meditation.
  3. Explain the meditation practices in Hinduism.
  4. Describe the meditation practices in Buddhism.
  5. Describe the meditation practices in Taoism.
  6. Explain the meditation practices in Judaism.
  7. Discuss the meditation practices in Christianity.
  8. Describe the meditation practices in Sufism.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

There are many types of meditation. Some types appeal to people of an intellectual nature, while other types appeal to those who prefer the path of love and surrender. Individuals with an active approach to life may prefer meditation techniques involving movement, while other individuals enjoy using a mantra, visualization, or concentration. Although there are many other types of meditation, this course covers Transcendental Meditation™, guided imagery and visualization meditation, mindfulness meditation, Osho Kundalini Meditation™, Vipassana meditation, walking meditation, laughter meditation, centering prayer meditation, and concentration meditation.

Objectives

  1. Describe the general health benefits of meditation.
  2. Describe the origins, health benefits, and guidelines for the practice for Transcendental Meditation™.
  3. Explain guided imagery and visualization meditation.
  4. Discuss the seven key factors and health benefits of mindfulness meditation.
  5. Describe Osho Kundalini Meditation and its four stages of practice.
  6. Explain the origins and practices of Vipassana meditation.
  7. Describe walking meditation, how to practice it, and the phases of walking a labyrinth.
  8. Examine the health benefits and the practice of laughter meditation.
  9. Describe vibrational and sound meditation.
  10. Explain centering prayer meditation and the seven steps for practicing it.
  11. Define concentration meditation and the five actions that help the meditator focus on a single thought.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Mental Health and Aging

Mindfulness Meditation

Modern Nutritional Issues

Description

This course will provide health care professionals with an overview of mental health and aging, including mental health wellness strategies, mental health disorders, cultural competence, cultural diversity, complementary and alternative medicine treatments, animal-assisted therapy and mental health, mental health resources, and trends in mental health and aging. This course describes the most commonly occurring mental health problems experienced by older adults and important factors related to mental health promotion and wellness.

Objectives

  1. Describe the factors related to mental health promotion and wellness.
  2. Identify and describe the five most common mental health and emotional disorders and the current forms of intervention and/or treatment.
  3. Discuss the provision of culturally competent mental health care.
  4. Explore cultural factors that influence mental health in the older adult.
  5. Examine the ways that animal-assisted therapy can affect mental health.
  6. Examine complementary and alternative medicine intervention and treatment methods for the elderly.
  7. Evaluate the extent of mental health resources and supportive services available in the care of older adults.
  8. Describe trends in mental health treatment and care of older adults.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

The health benefits of mindfulness meditation include improvements in dealing with stress, pain, and illness. Anyone can engage in this form of meditation, which places no emphasis on religious or faith practices. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of mindfulness meditation, describe the health benefits of mindfulness meditation, discuss mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), and examine the techniques and practices for mindfulness meditation.

Objectives

  1. Define mindfulness meditation.
  2. Describe the seven key factors of the practice of mindfulness meditation.
  3. Compare and contrast the seven characteristics of “doing” and “being.”
  4. Identify mindfulness meditation myths.
  5. Describe the health benefits of mindfulness meditation.
  6. Examine mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR).
  7. Describe the use of mindfulness meditation for psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders.
  8. Discuss the benefits of mindfulness meditation when combined with goal management training (GMT) for substance abuse treatment.
  9. Identify the elements of practicing a basic mindfulness meditation.
  10. Practice the raisin and chocolate mindfulness meditations.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Our diet has a profound impact our health and well-being, yet many of us are not aware of where our food originated. We eat toxic, irradiated, or genetically altered foods; and we eat more than we need. How can we change our eating habits and become more conscious of what we eat, why we eat it, and how it is prepared? This course provides an overview of the types of toxins found in food and the effects of irradiation, genetically altered foods, and food allergies on our health.

Objectives

  1. Identify the various toxins in our food chain.
  2. Describe the effects of irradiation, genetically altered foods, and food allergies.
  3. Describe the types and functions of nutraceuticals.
  4. Discuss the role of supplements in our diet.
  5. Describe the concept of spiritual nutrition.

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1.20 Hours | 0.12 AOTA CEUs

$12.00

Music Therapy and Sound Healing

Music, Sound, and the Healthy Brain

Native North American Healing

Description

In an age where people increasingly turn to holistic methods of healing, music therapy and sound healing have entered mainstream health care and can be used successfully with people of all ages and disabilities. This course examines sound and music as well as its impact on health.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the principles of sound.
  2. Define music therapy.
  3. Describe the areas of sound healing.
  4. Examine music therapy interventions.
  5. Describe examples of therapeutic uses and benefits of music.
  6. Explain music therapy modalities.
  7. Describe the physiological and psychological responses to music.
  8. Discuss evidence-based practice in music therapy.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Whether you are listening to rock music in your car or listening to Mozart at home, music has an affect on your brain. Engaging in musical activity (listening and creating) involves almost every region of your brain. Music affects our brains, our minds, our thoughts, and our spirit.

Objectives

  1. Describe the elements of music.
  2. Describe the principles of sound.
  3. Discuss how music engages the whole brain.
  4. Explain the whole-body benefits of music.
  5. Identify the physiological effects of music.
  6. Identify the psychological effects of music.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Millions of Native North Americans utilize traditional healing traditions as a way of maintaining balance and wholeness. To the traditional Native American, all aspects of life are intimately connected to good health and well-being, and life is a sacred path. This ancient, holistic healthcare system is complex, utilizing medicine wheels, sacred plants, and a variety of healing techniques. Today, there are encouraging signs of acceptance and cooperation between conventional Western practitioners and American Indian healers.

Objectives

  1. Describe the basic philosophical tenets of Native North American healing traditions.
  2. Explain the purpose and elements of the medicine wheel.
  3. Discuss traditional healing techniques of Native North Americans.
  4. Compare and contrast the four sacred medicines used by Native North Americans.
  5. Identify the purpose of games in Native North American well-being.

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1.50 Hours

$15.00

Natural Products: Nutraceuticals, Probiotics, Herbs, and Botanicals

Natural Sweeteners: Healthy Options for Your Sweet Tooth

Nature And Healing - The Power Of Connection

Description

Our diet has a profound impact our health and well-being, yet many of us are not aware of where our food originates from and even less of us are aware of exactly what is in these foods. Many individuals eat foods sprayed by numerous pesticides, grown in depleted soil, “enhanced” with hormones and antibiotics, or obtained from countries thousands of miles away from our home. How can we change our eating habits and become more conscious of what we eat, why we eat it, and how it is prepared? How can we use that information and select healthy “natural products” designed to support our diet and support our health?

Objectives

  1. Describe the types and functions of nutraceuticals.
  2. Define natural products and whole foods.
  3. Compare and contrast antioxidants and phytonutrients.
  4. Explain the role of probiotics in health.
  5. Discuss what probiotics are and where they can be found.
  6. Discuss the role of herbs and herbalism in health care.
  7. Explain the herbal production process.
  8. Explain the actions of herbs.
  9. Explain the key concerns of herbalism today.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Most Americans consume far more sugar than they require and this contributes to obesity as well as many types of diseases. The role of sugar in the American diet is an important one. Understanding its effect on the body and its role in inflammation and disease can significantly impact one’s health. Alternatives to refined sugar are numerous but are they safe and effective?

Objectives

  1. Describe the historical role of sugar in the American diet.
  2. Define sugar.
  3. Describe how glucose is metabolized in the body.
  4. Identify the health effects of sugar on the body.
  5. Explain the glycemic index.
  6. Compare and contrast artificial and natural alternatives to sugar.
  7. Identify methods to reduce dietary sugar intake.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

The use of natural elements to heal or to support well-being is as old as human history, but it fell out of favor in the health-care profession for many decades. Now, the realization of the power of nature to heal is undergoing a tremendous resurgence and is providing additional therapies and tools for health care providers to help support the well-being and healing among patients, clients, staff, and community members.

Objectives

  1. Describe the benefits of interacting with nature.
  2. Discuss the more common models and philosophies that have influenced healing environmental design, including Feng Shui, anthroposophic medicine, sacred geometry, horticulture therapy, the Planetree model, Snoezelen therapy, and the green movement.
  3. Examine the impact of gardens on health and well-being.
  4. Describe elements of healing gardens.
  5. Compare and contrast the characteristics of medicinal gardens, sensory gardens, memorial gardens, and edible gardens.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Naturopathy: A Natural System of Healing

Nutrition and Health - What’s the Connection?

Nutrition and Healthy Aging

Description

Naturopathic medicine has a long, complex history. Considered a way of life and a system of healing encompassing many different modalities, naturopathy is experiencing a resurgence today as a result of the dissatisfaction many Americans feel about conventional medicine and the growing interest and respect for alternative and complementary methods of healing.

Objectives

  1. Define naturopathic medicine.
  2. Describe the founding influences of naturopathy.
  3. Examine the schools of thought that form the philosophical basis of naturopathy.
  4. Discuss the six principles of naturopathy.
  5. Compare and contrast the educational requirements of the categories of naturopathic practitioners.
  6. Identify conditions for which naturopathic medicine may be beneficial.
  7. Describe training, licensing, and efficacy issues related to naturopathic medicine.
  8. Examine issues related to the integration of naturopathy medicine into mainstream healthcare.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

What we eat profoundly affects our health and well-being: Obesity is at epidemic proportions in the United States. Many of us eat more than we require; we eat when we are rushed; we don’t understand how various food elements interact, and we are not as knowledgeable as we could be about various diet types and their effects on our health.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of food and health in human history.
  2. Define diet and nutrition.
  3. Identify the macronutrients and their role in nutrition and health.
  4. Identify the micronutrients and their role in nutrition and health.
  5. Describe the key features and focus of high-fiber, high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets and the Atkins diet.
  6. Describe the key features and focus of moderate-fat, balanced nutrient, reduction diets; the raw food diet; and vegetarian and vegan diets.
  7. Describe the key features and focus of the elimination and anti-inflammatory diets.
  8. Explain the relationship between nutrition and stress.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Increasing scientific, clinical, and social interest helps us understand the relationship between nutrition and aging. Eating well is essential in all stages of life but is especially important for maintaining good health and slowing the aging process in older adults: Nutrition influences the risk of contracting acute and chronic diseases and affects the physiological and biological processes of aging. Making healthy food choices also has social impacts, since healthy adults are more productive members of society and utilize fewer resources on multiple levels than unhealthy adults.

Objectives

  1. Identify nutrient needs specific for healthy aging.
  2. Describe how age-related physiological and psychological changes impact nutritional status.
  3. Describe the need for fiber in the diet of older adults.
  4. Discuss the benefits of omega-3 fatty acids.
  5. Identify the benefits of probiotics.
  6. Describe how age-related social and economic changes impact nutritional status.
  7. Describe how food-borne illnesses affect older adults.
  8. Discuss the United States’ governmental MyPlate food guidelines.
  9. Explain the purpose of the Older Americans Nutrition Program (OANP).

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Nutrition, Stress, and Immune Function

Nutrition: An Integrative Approach

Obesity In America - A Public Health Epidemic

Description

Most individuals enjoy sitting down and eating a delicious meal. Food provides an opportunity to socialize and, if the food is nutritious, it also supports a healthy body and mind. However, if an individual is stressed, the nutrients they eat are not able to be utilized as effectively as when they are relaxed. If stress causes an individual to eat food that is not nutritious, health issues can result. Nutrition, stress, and the immune system are closely related.

Objectives

  1. Describe the relationship between food and emotions.
  2. Explain the stress response.
  3. Describe the domino theory as it relates to nutrition and stress.
  4. Discuss the effects of stress on digestion, metabolism, and health.
  5. List the three steps and seven skills of mindful eating.
  6. Describe aspects of nutrition and eating that support a healthy immune system.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Description

What we eat profoundly impacts our health and well-being, yet many of us eat when we are rushed; we don’t know where our food originated; we eat toxic, irradiated, or genetically altered foods; and we eat more than we need. How can we revise our eating habits and become more conscious of what we eat, why we eat it, and how it is prepared? This course examines the concept of holistic nutrition and examines the profound impact of food on our health.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of food and health in human history.
  2. Define diet and nutrition.
  3. Identify the macronutrients and their role in nutrition and health.
  4. Identify the micronutrients and their role in nutrition and health.
  5. Describe the key features and focus of high-fiber, high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets and the Atkins diet.
  6. Describe the key features and focus of moderate-fat, balanced nutrient, reduction diets; the raw food diet; and vegetarian and vegan diets.
  7. Describe the key features and focus of the elimination and anti-inflammatory diets.
  8. Describe the types and functions of nutraceuticals.
  9. Describe supplements and their roles.
  10. Identify the various toxins in our food chain.
  11. Describe the effects of irradiation, genetically altered foods, and food allergies.
  12. Describe the role of herbs and herbalism in health care.
  13. Explain the herbal production process.
  14. Describe the levels of herbalists.
  15. Identify the actions of herbs.
  16. Describe the key concerns of herbalism today.

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3.50 Hours | 0.35 AOTA CEUs

$35.00

Description

Two-thirds of adults and one-third of children in the United States are overweight or obese. Left unchecked, the effects of this crisis on the nation’s health, health-care costs, and productivity could be catastrophic. As a nation, we’re getting more obese every day, many of our children are obese, and our life expectancies are much shorter because of it, despite trying many types of diets, eating less, and moving more.

Objectives

  1. Describe the extent of obesity in the United States.
  2. Explain the difference between overweight and obese.
  3. List causes of overweight and obesity.
  4. Explain the health and economic consequences of obesity.
  5. Discuss pharmaceutical and surgical options for obese individuals.
  6. List complementary therapies used in weight management.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Our Rewired Brains--Technology and Health

Pain Assessment and Management in the Older Adult

Pain Interventions and Treatments

Description

Technology is an important and beneficial part of modern life. It can save us time, help us work more efficiently and effectively, and support personal and global changes. Yet many individuals never fully disconnect from their technological devices, and social, physical, emotional, and spiritual difficulties can occur as a result. Called “technostress,” this condition is often related to multitasking and can lead to loneliness, frustration, anxiety, and depression. Yet there are many ways to manage technostress and learn to use technology wisely.

Objectives

  1. Describe the extent of the use of technology today.
  2. Define technostress and technosis.
  3. Explain the relationship between multitasking and technology.
  4. Identify the health impacts of technology, technostress, and multitasking.
  5. Describe methods of managing technostress.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Pain is a symptom that signals distress in virtually every population and every age. To provide quality care to aging adults, health care providers must be particularly skilled at assessing pain, understanding misconceptions of pain management, addressing cultural issues in pain management, and providing effective pain therapies. This course provides an overview of pain and its effective management, including cultural considerations and pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic management techniques.

Objectives

  1. Define pain.
  2. Describe how pain impacts the aging adult.
  3. State common misconceptions and facts about pain.
  4. Explain the physiology of pain.
  5. Identify the four types of pain.
  6. Describe pain behaviors.
  7. Explain the impact of culture on expressions of pain and on pain management.
  8. Identify the key elements of pain assessment.
  9. Describe barriers to effective pain management.
  10. Describe key elements of the pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic management of pain.

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2.20 Hours | 0.22 AOTA CEUs

$22.00

Description

Effective pain management begins with effective pain assessment. Only then can the health care provider determine how to best manage a client’s pain. This course provides an overview of the medications commonly used for pain relief, the physical and behavioral strategies for many types of pain relief.

Objectives

  1. Describe the common medications used for pain relief.
  2. Compare and contrast the types of pain treated by nonopioids and opioids.
  3. Describe common side effects of nonopioids and opioids.
  4. Identify the “five rights” of patient safety.
  5. Compare and contrast types of physical strategies for managing pain.
  6. Compare and contrast types of behavioral strategies for managing pain.
  7. Identify barriers that contribute to the undertreatment of pain.
  8. Describe methods for effectively managing acute/postoperative pain.
  9. Describe client and family considerations when developing a discharge pain management program.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Pain Management in Special Populations: Children and the Elderly

Pain Management in Special Populations: Surgery, Cancer, and HIV

Pain Management in the Adult: Acute and Chronic Pain

Description

Helping pediatric and geriatric populations manage their pain requires special consideration with regard to the types of medications and strategies chosen, the route through which medications are delivered, and specific comorbidities or metabolic issues that may be present. This course provides an overview of the issues unique to the pain management of the pediatric or geriatric patient.

Objectives

  1. Describe the pain management issues unique to the pediatric client.
  2. Describe how to assess a child for pain.
  3. Identify pain behaviors unique to specific age groups.
  4. Identify pain management strategies for the pediatric client.
  5. Describe physical strategies and behavioral approaches to managing pain in children.
  6. Identify causes of pain in the elderly client.
  7. Describe normal physiological changes in aging and their effects on the perception of pain in the elderly individual.
  8. Identify useful strategies for choosing and administering medication to the elderly client.
  9. Identify nonpharmacological options for pain control in elders.
  10. Describe specific pain management considerations in the client with an altered mental status.
  11. Identify compliance issues related to the elderly client.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Health care professionals often face difficult challenges when working with clients who have undergone surgery or who have cancer or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These clients encounter unique problems with their health conditions, especially when trying to manage their pain. This course provides an overview of the types of pain seen in these clients and presents a variety of methods, both traditional and nontraditional, for managing these challenging pain concerns.

Objectives

  1. List the types of surgeries and invasive procedures seen in the acute and outpatient setting.
  2. Describe types of surgical pain.
  3. Explain methods for managing surgical pain.
  4. Describe pain management alternatives, including types of medications, routes of administration, and alternative therapies.
  5. Describe the barriers to effective cancer pain management
  6. Identify types of cancer pain.
  7. Describe the prevalence of pain related to HIV infection.
  8. Identify etiologies of pain related to HIV infection.
  9. Describe common syndromes of pain with HIV infection as well as common treatments for these types of pain.
  10. Describe complementary therapies available for clients with HIV-related pain.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Acute and chronic pain in the adult client have different causes, methods of diagnoses, and interventions. Effective health care providers understand these differences when they assess and manage their clients’ pain.

Objectives

  1. Differentiate between acute and chronic pain in the adult.
  2. Describe common causes of acute and chronic pain.
  3. Describe common types of chronic pain, including causes and treatments for each type.
  4. Discuss pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions for acute and chronic pain.
  5. Describe barriers to the effective treatment of pain.
  6. Explain factors to consider when educating clients about their pain management regimen.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Pain Theory and Assessment Principles

Pediatric Abusive Head Trauma (Shaken Baby Syndrome)

Pediatric End-of-Life Care - Compassion and Caring

Description

Pain is the fifth vital sign and its assessment is crucial in the comprehensive care of every patient. Pain is a subjective concept and is whatever the client says it is. This course provides an overview of the types and physiology of pain, variables that affect it, and assessment processes.

Objectives

  1. Define pain.
  2. Compare and contrast acute and chronic pain.
  3. Explain the pathophysiology of pain.
  4. Describe the types of pain.
  5. Identify variables that affect pain.
  6. Describe various pain assessment strategies.
  7. Describe barriers to an adequate pain assessment.
  8. Explain the role of documentation in the assessment of pain.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

The crime of pediatric abusive head trauma (PAHT) is a preventable and severe form of child abuse. In the United States, child abuse is the third leading cause of all head injuries, and its prevention and treatment present a challenge to health care providers. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of PAHT, also called “shaken baby syndrome.” The epidemiology, risk factors, physical signs and symptoms, diagnosis and treatment, and prevention strategies are discussed.

Objectives

  1. Describe the extent of PAHT in the United States.
  2. Identify the key historical elements in the recognition of PAHT.
  3. List triggers and risk factors for PAHT.
  4. Describe the physical signs and symptoms of PAHT.
  5. Explain the diagnostic and treatment options for victims of PAHT.
  6. Describe the typical perpetrators in PAHT cases.
  7. Explain methods and strategies for the prevention of PAHT.
  8. Explain the role of the health care professional in the identification and prevention of PAHT.

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2.00 Hours

$20.00

Description

The death of a child is a devastating event with long-lasting effects on family, friends, and health care providers. While pediatric death rates in the United States have declined in the last century, pediatric death remains a critical health care issue. Often parents and children do not receive the care they deserve and require during this challenging time.

Objectives

  1. Describe the epidemiology of pediatric end of life.
  2. Differentiate between hospice care, palliative care, and end-of-life care.
  3. Explain important elements of care related to pediatric symptom management at the end of life.
  4. Discuss factors to consider when caring for parents and a dying child.
  5. Explain facets of the spiritual care of the dying child.
  6. Identify future directions for pediatric palliative care. Identify special issues related to end-of-life care and the pediatric patient.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Perinatal Health - A Global Perspective

Physical Activity and Healthy Aging

Physiology of Aging

Description

Poverty, scarce education, poor economic opportunities, gender discrimination, and unjust laws challenge the advancement of women’s health around the world. These factors restrict access to important health services and the education women need to improve their lives and the lives of their children and community. When a priority is placed on women’s health concerns, women’s rights, and empowerment, immense improvements in the health and well-being of women and their children result.

Objectives

  1. List the United Nations’ key Millennium Development Goals affecting women and children.
  2. Describe the extent of women’s health issues.
  3. Explain the role of malnutrition and lack of adequate numbers of health-care workers on women’s health.
  4. Describe the role of gender-based violence on global women’s health.
  5. Describe female genital mutilation (FGM) and its role in women’s health.
  6. Describe newborn and child issues that affect health.
  7. Identify global initiatives for improving the global health of women and children.

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1.50 Hours

$15.00

Description

Physical activity is essential for healthy aging and well-being. Throughout life, engaging in enjoyable movement, such as walking, dancing, golfing, swimming, and cycling can increase the chances for health and vitality in later years. The goal of this course is to examine the physiological and psychological benefits of physical activity.

Objectives

  1. Describe the physiological benefits of exercise.
  2. Describe the types of physical activity.
  3. Differentiate between anaerobic activity and aerobic activity.
  4. Explain the physiological effects of physical activity.
  5. Identify the risks of physical activity.
  6. Explain the psychological effects of exercise on health.
  7. Describe the benefits of movement activities such as walking, yoga, and tai chi.
  8. Discuss the methods for initiating a physical activity program.

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Description

There are more older adults in the United States than ever before in history, making this segment one of the fastest-growing portions of the population. The appropriate care of older adults requires health care providers to have a solid understanding of the physiologic changes that accompany aging. This course explores aging, reviews the theories of aging, and examine the physical changes in body systems associated with aging.

Objectives

  1. Define aging and describe the changing perception of aging in the United States.
  2. Describe elements of an effective health care assessment of the aging adult.
  3. State the physiologic changes of aging related to the cardiovascular system.
  4. State the physiologic changes of aging related to the endocrine system.
  5. State the physiologic changes of aging related to the gastrointestinal system.
  6. State the physiologic changes of aging related to the immune system.
  7. Describe the physiologic changes of aging related to the integumentary system.
  8. State the physiologic changes of aging related to the musculoskeletal system and describe how physical activity affects these changes.
  9. State the physiologic changes of aging related to the nervous system and the reproductive system.
  10. State the physiologic changes of aging related to the respiratory, sensory, and urinary systems.

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2.40 Hours | 0.24 AOTA CEUs

$24.00

Physiology of Stress

Place and Space: Healing Environments

Play and the Brain: Why Play Matters to Your Gray Matter

Description

Stress is at epidemic levels in the world today. Currently, as many as 90 percent of all visits to health-care providers in the United States are considered to be stress-related. Stress affects every aspect of the body, mind, and spirit, resulting in a wide range of symptoms from headaches or stomach ailments to heart disease or death. Stress is difficult to define because it varies from individual to individual. What one person finds stressful might not bother another person at all. There are many types of stress, and each can result in many different physiological effects on the body.

Objectives

  1. Compare the different definitions of stress.
  2. Describe the origins and concepts of stress.
  3. Identify the stages of the general adaptation syndrome (GAS).
  4. Explain the fight-or-flight response.
  5. Describe the three levels and two forms of stress.
  6. Discuss the body’s responses to stress.
  7. Describe the effects of stress on the nervous system.
  8. Describe the effects of stress on the endocrine system.
  9. Describe the effects of stress on the immune system.
  10. Describe the relationship between stress and the cardiovascular system.
  11. Explain the relationship between stress and the gastrointestinal system.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Health care providers can assist clients with their healing process through the creation of healing environments—spaces that support the individual’s inner healer and utilize the environment to maximize its healing effects. This course will provide an overview of the elements of healing environment and its effect on health and describe how to create a healing environment.

Objectives

  1. Define healing environment.
  2. Describe the historical evolution of healing environments.
  3. Identify the outcomes of a healing environment.
  4. Describe the role of color in creating a healing environment.
  5. Describe the role of nature in creating a healing environment.
  6. Describe the role of lighting in creating a healing environment.
  7. Describe the roles of air quality and temperature in a healing environment.
  8. Describe the role of smells in a healing environment.
  9. Describe the role of noise in a healing environment.
  10. Describe the roles of buildings and furnishings in a healing environment.
  11. Define wayfinding and describe its importance in a healthy environment.
  12. Describe specific considerations when designing a healing environment for children.
  13. Describe the roles of communication and education in a healthy environment.
  14. Explain the role of the health care provider in creating a healing environment.

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3.50 Hours | 0.35 AOTA CEUs

$35.00

Description

“Act like a child” is probably not a phrase that is on the top of anyone’s mind. Yet, researchers are discovering that there are many health benefits to rediscovering our inner child. Play is vital to who we are as human beings and it is an essential component of a healthy life. Play is present in all mammals including human beings. In human beings, it is equally important for children as it is for adults. While childishness is not desirable, being “childlike” is.

Objectives

  1. Describe the importance of play in human development
  2. Explain the key characteristics of play and their relationship to brain health.
  3. Discuss types of play.
  4. Describe the categories of play personalities.
  5. Identify the health benefits of play, including the effects of play on the brain.
  6. List ways to incorporate play into everyday life.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Postpartum Depression

Prevention of Neonatal Group B Streptococcal Infection

Description

When individuals experience a traumatic, terrifying, life-changing event or series of events, with a real or threatened risk of death, they may experience a variety of symptoms known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although this condition has been described throughout history, veterans groups and health-care providers have been slow to acknowledge its existence or explore the many dimensions of the disorder.

Objectives

  1. Describe the nature and extent of PTSD.
  2. Identify proposed causes of PTSD.
  3. Explain risk factors for PTSD.
  4. Discuss the symptoms and diagnostic criteria for individuals with PTSD, including the two subtypes of PTSD.
  5. Describe current treatment modalities for individuals with PTSD.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

For most women, the birth of a baby is a joyous and exciting time. However, for some women, childbirth is accompanied by depression, anxiety, feelings of hopelessness, and even suicide. Depression following the delivery of an infant can take three basic forms: postpartum blues, postpartum psychosis, and postpartum depression. All three types can profoundly affect the lives of women and their families. This course examines the types of postpartum depression disorders, as well as their prevalence, causes, symptoms, and treatment options.

Objectives

  1. Describe the three types of postpartum depression disorders.
  2. State the incidence and symptoms of postpartum blues.
  3. State the incidence and symptoms of postpartum psychosis.
  4. State the incidence of postpartum depression in the United States.
  5. Identify the theories about the causes of postpartum depression.
  6. List the symptoms of general depression and postpartum depression.
  7. Identify the risk factors for postpartum depression.
  8. Describe methods of screening women for postpartum depression.
  9. Explain treatments that are available for women who suffer from postpartum depression.
  10. Identify issues related to the use of antidepressants in the postpartum woman.
  11. Describe the issues surrounding male postpartum depression.

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3.00 Hours

$30.00

Description

Great strides have been made in preventing and treating neonatal group B streptococcal infection during the last few decades, especially with the use of prophylactic antibiotics during labor. In addition, the development of rapid detection tests and a vaccine look promising. This course will examine the incidence, risk factors, consequences, and treatment guidelines for Group B streptococcal infection.

Objectives

  1. Describe the impact of group B streptococcal (GBS) disease on the newborn.
  2. State the incidence of GBS in the United States.
  3. Describe how GBS is transmitted from mother to baby.
  4. Describe the two major types of GBS disease.
  5. List maternal consequences of GBS disease.
  6. List fetal consequences of GBS disease.
  7. Identify risk factors for early-onset GBS disease.
  8. Describe key considerations for collecting and processing vaginal and rectal cultures of GBS.
  9. Compare and contrast the screening strategy with the risk factor strategy in treating GBS.
  10. Explain the updated recommendations for preventing perinatal GBS disease.
  11. Describe the key issues in the recommendations for managing a newborn whose mother received intrapartum antimicrobial agents to prevent GBS or suspected chorioamnionitis.
  12. State the recommendations for intrapartum antimicrobial prophylaxis for GBS prevention.
  13. State the adverse effects and potential complications of chemoprophylaxis in GBS treatment.
  14. Identify future trends in GBS prevention and treatment.

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2.00 Hours

$20.00

Probiotics: Miracles or Myths?

Probiotics: Silent Partners in Health

Psychology of Stress

Description

Probiotics are live organisms believed to be healthy for the host organism. They are used globally to improve the health and well-being of animals and human beings. Sales on probiotic supplements have soared in recent years on the basis of intriguing research that demonstrates potential benefits for many chronic conditions, including cancer. With the rise in interest in integrative health as well as complementary and alternative therapies, this trend is likely to continue.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of microorganisms in our body.
  2. Differentiate between normobiosis and dysbiosis.
  3. Define probiotics.
  4. Differentiate between what probiotics are and are not in terms of characteristics, uses, and other microbes.
  5. List the subcategories of probiotics.
  6. Describe prebiotics and their role in health.
  7. Identify food products that contain probiotics.
  8. Explain the health uses for probiotics.
  9. Identify risks and considerations when using probiotics.
  10. Identify regulatory issues related to probiotics.
  11. Describe items that should be listed on a probiotic product.
  12. Identify current areas of probiotic research.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Probiotics are live organisms believed to be healthy for the host organism. They are used globally to improve the health and well-being of animals and human beings. Sales of probiotic supplements have soared in recent years on the basis of intriguing research that demonstrates potential benefits for many chronic conditions, including cancer. With the rise in interest in integrative health as well as complementary and alternative therapies, this trend is likely to continue.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of microorganisms in our body.
  2. Differentiate between normobiosis and dysbiosis.
  3. Define probiotics.
  4. Differentiate between what probiotics are and are not in terms of characteristics, uses, and other microbes.
  5. List the subcategories of probiotics.
  6. Describe prebiotics and their role in health.
  7. Identify food products that contain probiotics.
  8. Explain the health uses for probiotics.
  9. Identify risks and considerations when using probiotics.
  10. Identify regulatory issues related to probiotics.
  11. Describe items that should be listed on a probiotic product.
  12. Identify current areas of probiotic research.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Events, people, and circumstances fill our normal daily lives–along with a certain amount of stress. Some of us experience psychological effects from this stress, while others seem to be unaffected or even thrive when challenged. Why do we react differently to stressors? Despite much research on the topic, the answer is not clearly understood, but key elements include personality, emotional intelligence, and gender.

Objectives

  1. Describe the relationship between stress and personality types.
  2. Discuss how appraisal, coping, and emotion affect the stress response.
  3. Identify the elements of emotional intelligence and the relationship to psychological stress.
  4. Describe gender differences in response to stressors.
  5. Identify strategies for reducing psychological stress.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Sacred Spaces, Healing Places

Secrets of Successful Healthcare Entrepreneurs

Sleep and Aging

Description

Modern nursing was founded on the concepts of healing environments. Florence Nightingale was one of the first to realize the importance of nature, light, noise, and sensory stimulation in healing. Much more about healing environments has been learned since her day. This course provides health care professionals with an introduction to the power of healing environments and the elements that contribute to a healing environment.

Objectives

  1. Describe a sacred, healing environment.
  2. Explain the shift in healthcare focus to the use of healing environments.
  3. Describe the evolution of hospital design.
  4. Explain the role of the healthcare provider in creating a spiritually healing environment.
  5. Describe the roles of energy, elements, and space clearing in creating a spiritually healing environment.
  6. Describe the roles of color and lighting in creating a spiritually healing environment.
  7. Describe the roles of air quality, temperature, smells, and taste in creating a spiritually healing environment.
  8. Describe the roles of healing sounds, noise, furnishings, and altars in creating a spiritually healing environment.
  9. Define wayfinding and describe its importance in creating a healthy environment.
  10. Describe the roles of symbols and environmental messages in creating a spiritually healing environment.
  11. Describe the elements of nature and their importance in creating a healing environment.
  12. Explain the role of healing gardens in sacred spaces.

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2.30 Hours | 0.23 AOTA CEUs

$23.00

Description

Starting a new business is a lot of work. Despite the intense effort required to launch a new venture, successful entrepreneurs have many diverse characteristics that support their achievements and enhance their ability to create a successful business. By cultivating these characteristics, continually learning, being open to new possibilities, and committing to their vision, entrepreneurs can help ensure the success of their business.

Objectives

  1. Describe the stages of entrepreneurship.
  2. Identify types of mentors that may be helpful to entrepreneurs.
  3. Explain how entrepreneurs can enhance their creativity.
  4. Describe S.M.A.R.T. goals.
  5. Discuss the importance of courage, effective time management, and the pursuit of “higher vibrations” to entrepreneurs.
  6. Explain characteristics of successful leaders.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Sleep is essential to a healthy, productive life. While sleep disorders and changes affect all of us as we age, older adults undergo many sleep-related changes that can affect their physical and psychological well-being. This course presents a review of the normal stages of sleep, describes common sleep measurement tools, discusses sleep characteristics, identifies the changes that affect the quality and quantity of sleep as an individual ages, and identifies methods the health care provider can use to assess and assist clients with sleep changes as they age.

Objectives

  1. Define sleep and describe the characteristics of sleep.
  2. Compare REM and NREM stages of sleep.
  3. Describe common sleep measurement tools.
  4. Identify key characteristics of common sleep disorders, including insomnia, sleep apnea, circadian rhythm disorders, narcolepsy, periodic limb movements disorder, restless leg syndrome, and parasomnias.
  5. Describe sleep changes that occur in the aging population.
  6. Identify conditions that can shorten, interrupt, or delay sleep in the elderly.
  7. Explain the impact of diet on sleep patterns in the elderly.
  8. Identify sleep hygiene practices that may help aging clients sleep effectively.
  9. Describe common treatments for sleep disorders.

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2.10 Hours | 0.21 AOTA CEUs

$21.00

Sleep and the Brain: What’s the Connection?

Sleep Disorders: An Integrative Approach

Social Context of Stress

Description

Do you wake up in the morning feeling sleepy? Do you feel sleepy during the day? A good night’s sleep is as essential for your brain and your body as food and water. Sleep deprivation affects the brain in multiple ways, impairing judgment, affecting cognition, and slowing reaction times. Sleep quality affects our mental and physical health in ways science is just beginning to understand.

Objectives

  1. Describe several current theories of sleep.
  2. Examine the importance of sleep in maintaining a healthy brain and body.
  3. Discuss the stages of sleep and the effect on the brain.
  4. Describe the health effects of sleep deprivation.
  5. Identify the most common sleep disorders.
  6. Describe conventional and integrative treatments that support restorative sleep.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Description

Sleep disorders are very common complaints and they include difficulty falling asleep, early awakening, and interrupted sleep. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only one-third of adults say they get enough sleep every night. The primary types of sleep disorders, methods of diagnosing sleep conditions, conventional treatments, and integrative approaches to sleep disorders will be presented.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the scope of sleep disorders in the United States.
  2. Explain the cycles of sleep.
  3. Discuss the types of sleep disorders.
  4. Describe signs and symptoms of sleep related disorders.
  5. Describe methods used to diagnose sleep disorders.
  6. List conditions to consider in the differential diagnosis process.
  7. Discuss conventional treatment approaches to sleep disorders.
  8. Examine integrative approaches to sleep disorders.
  9. List three ways to increase awareness, diagnosis, and treatment of sleep disorders.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

A strong social support network is important during difficult times. A social support network consists of friends, family, and peers. Developing and maintaining supportive relationships provides feelings of belonging, self-worth, and security. Without a strong social support network, individuals can experience a sense of isolation, disconnection, and stress.

Objectives

  1. Describe the relationship between social support and stress.
  2. Identify ways to increase social connections.
  3. Examine the connection between incivility and stress.
  4. Describe ways to decrease the effects of incivility on health.
  5. Discuss the relationship between a lack of contact with nature and stress.
  6. Identify ways to increase contact with nature.
  7. Describe the impact of technology, social networking, and multitasking on health and well-being.
  8. Identify ways to control the stress effects of technology, social networking, and multitasking.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Sound and Art: Using The Ears And Eyes To Heal

South African Healing Traditions

Spiritual Assessment and Spiritual Care

Description

Music and art have tremendous healing powers. Creative expression offers patients and staff the ability to heal on multiple levels. Understanding of the intricate relationship between stress and the health of our body, mind, and spirit continues to grow, and we have discovered that healing therapies which incorporate art and music can actually change a person’s physiology. They connect individuals and communities, as well.

Objectives

  1. Describe the relationship between health and creativity with art and music.
  2. Identify the basic components of sound.
  3. Describe the role of music throughout history.
  4. Explain the effects of music on physical, emotional, and spiritual health.
  5. Explain music therapy and its modalities.
  6. Describe sound healing and its modalities.
  7. Define noise and the noise levels of various common sounds.
  8. Identify the health effects of noise.
  9. Describe ways to reduce noise in healing environments.
  10. Explain the role of art in healing.
  11. Explain art therapy and its role in healing.
  12. Identify the health effects of art and art therapy.
  13. Describe methods of incorporating art into healing environments.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Traditional healing has existed in South Africa for thousands of years and is utilized by the majority of individuals who live in the region. Drawing from a primarily oral tradition, traditional African healers come from many cultures, speak many diverse languages, and they specialize according to their talents and “calling.” To the individual who uses this form of healing and to the traditional South African healer, the body, mind, and spirit are intimately connected.

Objectives

  1. Describe the role of traditional healers in South Africa.
  2. Explain various traditional African healing practices and processes.
  3. Identify traditional African healing diagnostic techniques.
  4. Discuss the relationships between traditional African healers and their colleagues.

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1.50 Hours

$15.00

Description

Spiritual care is an important and necessary part of appropriate patient care, yet many health care professionals feel ill equipped to provide it to their clients. This course is designed to help health care professionals understand the elements of spiritual care and a spiritual assessment, understand the importance of providing this aspect of care, and learn strategies that can ensure a successful spiritual assessment. Several models will be discussed and considerations for the appropriate planning, implementation, and evaluation of spiritual care will be examined.

Objectives

  1. Define spiritual care.
  2. Describe the components of a spiritual assessment and describe why a spiritual assessment is an important part of client care.
  3. Describe strategies that can help ensure a successful spiritual assessment.
  4. Discuss several spiritual assessment models.
  5. Identify and describe types of alterations in spiritual integrity (spiritual diagnoses).
  6. Describe considerations for the planning, implementation, and evaluation of spiritual care.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Spiritual Care of the Dying

Spiritual Dimensions of Aging

Spiritual Nutrition - The Global Consequences of Food Choices

Description

The dying experience is unique for each individual. For many individuals, death is not an end to life. It is simply a passage to another dimension, sometimes called heaven, the spiritual world, another plane of existence, or nirvana. As knowledge of issues involved in death and dying increases and positive attitudes are promoted, the spiritual care and support for people who are dying will improve. This course provides spiritual, psychological, social, and cultural healing strategies that can assist health care providers in the spiritual care of the dying.

Objectives

  1. Describe the spiritual, psychological, and social dimensions of dying.
  2. Examine cultural considerations at the end of life.
  3. List some interactions, care giving strategies, and healing strategies that can assist healthcare providers in the spiritual care of the dying.
  4. Describe the use of the senses in rituals for the dying.
  5. Identify and describe aspects of hospice and palliative care.
  6. List advantages and disadvantages of dying at home.

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2.10 Hours | 0.21 AOTA CEUs

$21.00

Description

Aging presents unique challenges to an individual’s spiritual growth, development, and expression. This course examines the process of spiritual development in the aging individual, including the relationship between loss, hope, love, sexuality, religion, health, and spirituality, the roles of spirituality and religion in helping the aging adult cope with personal difficulties, and the importance of cultural wisdom and spiritual elders.

Objectives

  1. Describe the unique spiritual challenges of aging.
  2. Describe the process of spiritual development in the aging individual.
  3. Explain the relationship between loss, hope, spirituality, and aging.
  4. Describe the relationship between love, sexuality, and spirituality in the older adult.
  5. Explain the relationship between religion, spirituality, aging, and health.
  6. Identify how spirituality and religion help the aging adult cope with personal difficulties, stress, surgery, chronic illness, and cancer.
  7. Describe cultural wisdom and the role of spiritual elders.

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2.20 Hours | 0.22 AOTA CEUs

$22.00

Description

Food is a dynamic force that interacts with our bodies on multiple levels: the physical level, the mental-emotional level, and the energetic or spiritual level. Conscious eating involves an awareness of the eating process from beginning to end, and it includes thinking about how dietary choices affect others. Any food choice that is truly good for an individual’s physical health and well-being will also be good for his/her spiritual well-being. Today’s food landscape is dominated by factory farms and food industry practices that violate spiritual principles, as well as human and animal rights, and damage the health of the plane.

Objectives

  1. Describe the concept of spiritual nutrition.
  2. Describe roles of food and nutrition in the lives of most individuals.
  3. Explain “factory farming.”
  4. Discuss the impact of hormones, antibiotics, and other additives on human health.
  5. Explain the impact of factory farming on animal welfare.
  6. Discuss the impact of factory farming on human welfare and health
  7. Describe the environmental and public health impact of factory farming.
  8. Identify ways to make spiritual food choices that support conscious eating.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Spiritual Rituals

Spirituality and the Grieving Process

Spirituality, Culture, and Health

Description

The spiritual rituals of prayer, meditation, guided imagery, gratitude, spending time in nature, and art can all help people connect to their inner being, to others, and to a divine spirit or higher power. A part of spiritual and cultural traditions, rituals help to provide awareness, meaning, intention, and purpose in life. This course will explore these healing spiritual rituals.

Objectives

  1. Describe three phases of creating rituals.
  2. Examine the spiritual ritual of prayer in health and healing.
  3. Describe types and techniques of meditation, visualization, and guided imagery and describe their relationship to healing.
  4. Explain the spiritual rituals of gratitude, spending time in nature, and art.
  5. Discuss dancing and ritual.
  6. Describe the importance of storytelling in spiritual care.
  7. Provide examples of why rituals work as a healing force.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Dealing with loss and grief is one of the great spiritual challenges of life. Individuals experience grief differently, depending on their inner resources, support, and relationships. Grief is subjective and can have psychological, social, and spiritual responses. Although cultural expressions of grief may vary, the deep sense of loss and sorrow is almost universal. This course reviews the grieving process and explores grief reactions, the role of grief counseling and the elements of healing.

Objectives

  1. Describe the grieving process.
  2. Identify types of grief responses.
  3. Describe the spiritual dimensions of grief.
  4. Describe cultural differences in response to grief.
  5. Identify the goals of grief counseling and the elements of healing.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Health care professionals and spiritual care providers face many challenges in becoming prepared to administer holistic, respectful, culturally, and spiritually competent care for their patients and clients. This course introduces the health care professional to the relationship between spirituality, culture, and health, discusses major health belief and health care systems and examines spiritual and health care practices of the major ethnic groups in the United States.

Objectives

  1. Describe the relationship between spirituality, culture, and health.
  2. Define compassion and explain what is meant by culturally competent care.
  3. Examine the components of a cultural and spiritual self-assessment.
  4. Identify three major health belief systems.
  5. Identify four major healthcare systems.
  6. Describe specific characteristics about the composition, spiritual and religious practices, cultural aspects, and unique healthcare issues of various ethnic groups.
  7. Explain the relationship between language and culturally competent care.
  8. List the 14 national standards for culturally and linguistically appropriate services in health care.

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2.20 Hours | 0.22 AOTA CEUs

$22.00

Spirituality, Religion, and Children

Spirituality, Religion, and Health

Spirituality, The Health Care Professional, and the Spiritual Care Provider

Description

Spirituality is a dynamic, evolving process that begins in infancy and continues throughout life. The spiritual development in children is especially important because of its impact on the rest of the child’s life. This course provides an overview of spiritual and religious development in children. Spiritual distress, methods of providing spiritual care to children, and specific care concerns for children with a chronic or terminal illness are also presented.

Objectives

  1. Describe the development of spirituality and religion in children.
  2. Identify the relationship between the phases of psychosocial development and spiritual development in children according to Fowler, Piaget, and Erikson.
  3. List the characteristics of spiritual distress in children.
  4. Explain methods of providing spiritual care to children of various ages.
  5. Describe specific care concerns for children with a chronic illness or for those who are dying.

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2.20 Hours | 0.22 AOTA CEUs

$22.00

Description

Religion and spirituality are distinct yet related concepts. An individual’s spirituality, religious beliefs, and religious practices can all have a profound effect on his or her health. This course explores the relationships between spirituality, religion, and health, examines the major spiritual elements and rituals of Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity and discusses the role of health care providers in supporting their clients’ spiritual and religious beliefs.

Objectives

  1. Describe the concepts of religion and religiosity.
  2. Identify the connection between spirituality, religion, and health.
  3. Describe major spiritual elements and rituals found in Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Christianity.
  4. Discuss the benefits of religion on specific healthcare conditions.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

The relationship between health care provider and client can provide both with a sense of strength, healing, inner peace, and an interconnectedness that gives meaning to the relationship. This relationship is examined in this course as well and health care providers are provided with an understanding of the types of spiritual care generalists and specialists, as well their roles and responsibilities in providing spiritual care.

Objectives

  1. Describe the relationship between healthcare providers, spirituality, and religion.
  2. Identify the types of spiritual care generalists and specialists and describe their role in providing spiritual care.
  3. Describe the influence of a healthcare provider’s spirituality on his or her ability to provide spiritual care.
  4. List barriers to providing spiritual care to clients.
  5. Explain key moral and ethical considerations when providing spiritual care.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Starting Your Own Business in Holistic and Integrative Health

Stress and Nutrition

Stress and Physical Activity

Description

Starting your own business in health and healing provides many exciting options to create a way to live and work that allows you to express your deepest core values and explore your own health and well-being more fully. Determining how to start your own business requires insight, and specific steps help ensure the process is successful.

Objectives

  1. List health effects of job stress.
  2. Compare and contrast holistic and/or integrative therapies and wellness.
  3. Describe the prevalence of holistic and integrative care in the United States.
  4. List options for careers in holistic and integrative health.
  5. Identify the advantages and disadvantages of being your own boss.
  6. Compare and contrast the differences between being an intrapreneur and entrepreneur.
  7. Analyze personal traits to determine readiness for business ownership.
  8. Describe steps to take to when preparing to make a career shift.
  9. Explain key educational issues to consider related to careers in the field of holistic and integrative health and wellness.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Most individuals enjoy sitting down and eating a delicious meal. Food provides an opportunity to socialize and, if the food is nutritious, it also supports a healthy body and mind. However, when individuals are stressed, they are not able to utilize the nutrients they eat as effectively as when they are relaxed. If stress causes an individual to eat food that is not nutritious, health issues can result. Nutrition, stress, and the immune system are closely related.

Objectives

  1. Describe the relationship between food and emotions.
  2. Describe the domino theory as it relates to nutrition and stress.
  3. Discuss the effects of stress on digestion, metabolism, and health.
  4. List the three steps and seven skills of mindful eating.
  5. Describe aspects of nutrition and eating that support a healthy immune system.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Description

Physical activity is essential in a program for stress management and overall health. This can include activities such as walking, running, swimming, cycling, skiing, dancing, gardening, yoga, Qigong, Tai Chi Chuan, weight lifting, stretching, as well as many other practices. These activities provide an integrative, holistic, healthy way to connect mind, body, and spirit, which improve physical, mental, and emotional health.

Objectives

  1. Describe the components and categories of physical activity.
  2. Describe the physiological benefits of physical activity.
  3. Describe the benefits of yoga for stress reduction.
  4. Identify the benefits of Qigong for stress reduction.
  5. Identify the benefits of Tai Chi Chuan for stress reduction.
  6. Identify the benefits of walking for stress reduction.
  7. Describe guidelines for starting a physical activity routine for stress reduction.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Stress Reduction Techniques and Therapies

The Air We Breathe - How Air Quality Affects Health And Well-Being

The Amazing Brain: Understanding the Basics

Description

You may think you don’t have a lot of control over the stress in your life, but you have more control than you might think. There are many ways to manage and reduce stress by using stress-relieving techniques and therapies. The goal of this course is to provide an overview of the techniques and therapies to reduce and manage stress, which include self-awareness, cognitive restructuring, sound healing and music therapy, meditation, nature, imagery, biofeedback, art, and dance.

Objectives

  1. Identify how self-awareness can help an individual manage stress.
  2. Describe the roles of cognitive restructuring, cognitive behavior therapy, and effective communication in stress management.
  3. Identify the ways sound and music therapy affect the body and reduce stress.
  4. Examine the effects of meditation on stress.
  5. Discuss the stress-reduction benefits of interacting with nature.
  6. Describe the stress-reduction benefits of biofeedback.
  7. Describe the benefits of art therapy in reducing stress.
  8. Identify the benefits of dance therapy in stress management.
  9. Explain how imagery can be used to manage stress.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

The quality of the air we breathe is essential to our overall well-being. Contaminants in our external air, as well as the air we breathe in our homes and workplaces, play a role in many diseases. In high enough concentrations, these contaminants can be fatal. Creating optimal healing environments requires close attention to air quality, temperature, humidity, and odors.

Objectives

  1. Identify key elements and sources of external air pollution.
  2. Describe the health impacts of key elements of external air pollution.
  3. Describe the role of health-care organizations in releasing mercury, polyvinyl chloride, and dioxin into the air.
  4. Identify key elements and sources of indoor air pollution.
  5. Describe the health impacts of key elements of indoor air pollution.
  6. Describe how airborne pathogens are transmitted.
  7. Describe the role of health -care organizations in the transmission of air-borne pathogens.
  8. Explain the effect of temperature, humidity, and odors on human health and well-being.
  9. Identify methods of reducing or eliminating external and internal air pollution.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

The brain is an amazing organ. Weighing approximately three pounds, and containing approximately 100 billion neurons, the brain controls all necessary functions of the body, receives and interprets information from the outside world, and embodies the essence of the mind. Intelligence, emotion, and memories are just a few of the processes governed by the brain.

Objectives

  1. Describe the components of the nervous system.
  2. Describe the structures and functions of the brain.
  3. Identify the functions of the two hemispheres of the brain.
  4. Explain the role of neuron connections, synapses, and neurotransmitters.
  5. Describe the effects of normal aging on the brain.
  6. Describe the role of brain imaging and gene studies in the identification of neurological disorders.
  7. Examine the effects of genes and the environment on brain health.
  8. Differentiate between current theories of neuroplasticity, neurogenesis, and epigenetics.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

The Chakra System

The Effects of Stress on Health

The Healthy Aging Brain

Description

The chakra system has been practiced by yogis for thousands of years as an integral part of healing. Recently, interest in this ancient system has exploded within the health care profession and the general population. Chakras are spinning vortices of energy positioned in seven centers of the body from the coccyx to the crown of the head. This course will provide an overview of the chakra system, chakras, and elements of chakra balancing.

Objectives

  1. Define the term chakra.
  2. Discuss the seven chakras.
  3. Describe the location of each chakra within the body, its purpose, and its associated color.
  4. List the endocrine gland associated with each chakra.
  5. Describe the element and sense associated with each chakra.
  6. Examine excessive and deficient characteristics focused on when balancing the chakras.
  7. Differentiate between the functional and dysfunctional archetypes associated with each chakra.
  8. Describe the psychological and physiological benefits of chakra meditation.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Stress can dramatically affect the body and the mind to the detriment of physical and psychological health. Both acute and chronic stress, the timing and duration of stress, gender, and genetics play a role in the complex relationship between stress and health.

Objectives

  1. Explain the role of oxidative stress and gender on health.
  2. Describe the relationship between stress and the development of cancer.
  3. Explain how stress impacts the development of cardiovascular disease.
  4. Discuss how stress affects the onset and progress of diabetes and its associated complications.
  5. Describe the role of stress in drug use.
  6. Explain the relationship between stress and depression.
  7. Discuss the relationship between post-traumatic stress disorder, irritable bowel syndrome, asthma, sleep disorders and stress.
  8. Describe the role of stress in the onset and progress of eating disorders.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

The brain is the most complex part of the human body. People once believed that progressive mental decline was inevitable, but now we know that the brain’s ability to age well varies from person to person and is affected by genetic predisposition, genes, life experiences, lifestyle, exposure to toxins and chemicals, accidents, trauma, and disease. Cognitive abilities do not automatically decline with age: the majority of older adults are happy; they live an active, optimistic life with many friends; and they engage in leisure-time activities that increase not only their quality of life but also their longevity and the health of their brains.

Objectives

  1. Identify the components of the brain and their functions related to healthy aging.
  2. Describe the three phases involved in memory.
  3. Differentiate the current theories of neuroplasticity, neurogenesis, and epigenetics.
  4. Describe the purpose of The Healthy Brain Initiative: A National Public Health Road Map to Maintaining Cognitive Health.
  5. Discuss the benefits of physical activity, mental stimulation, nutrition, socialization, creativity, attitude, and spirituality on the aging brain.
  6. Describe the effects of meditation on the aging brain.
  7. Examine technological and medical advances that will impact the health of the aging brain.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

The Older Woman

The Power of Design--Healthy Buildings, Healthy Communities

Therapeutic Interventions for Healing

Description

America is growing older and most older Americans are women. Today’s older woman is part of a diverse group that varies in income, education level, health, functional abilities, living arrangements, and access to support services. Because women live longer than men, they face unique economic, social, and health challenges. This course provides an overview of demographic trends related to the older woman and examines key challenges faced by aging women.

Objectives

  1. Describe the demographic trends specific to the older woman.
  2. Describe the unique characteristics of centenarians.
  3. Examine the specific economic concerns of older women.
  4. Explain the specific health care issues of older women.
  5. Identify the challenges women face as caregivers.
  6. Identify social concerns of older women.
  7. Describe the special health considerations of older women regarding heart disease, cancer, and stroke.
  8. Describe the special health considerations of older women regarding osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and urinary incontinence.
  9. Examine the special health considerations of older women regarding depression, skin conditions, HIV/AIDS, and emerging infections.

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2.10 Hours | 0.21 AOTA CEUs

$21.00

Description

Today’s health-care leaders face myriad challenges in providing safe, effective, high-quality care for patients while creating a work environment that supports the health and well-being of staff. The design of their facilities plays a critical role in these two vital aspects of care.

Objectives

  1. Explain why the development of healing organizations is important in today’s health care industry.
  2. Describe the elements of evidence-based design that impact health care.
  3. List reasons why effective design affects the organization’s bottom line.
  4. Discuss green guidelines for health care.
  5. Explain the importance of sustainability to health care organizations.
  6. Discuss the importance of physical security to health care facilities
  7. Describe the role of cultural responsiveness in health care facility design.
  8. Explain the characteristics of furnishings that create healing spaces.
  9. Discuss the role of wayfinding in health care design.
  10. Identify wayfinding elements that support healing environments.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

The therapeutic interventions of music, art, dance, humor, and animal-assisted therapy can be integrated into mainstream medicine and should be considered as complements, not replacements for, mainstream medical treatments. The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) is evaluating these therapeutic interventions and research is demonstrating that they are not only safe but effective as well. This course provides an overview of these mind-body-spirit healing interventions and discusses their therapeutic uses and benefits.

Objectives

  1. Describe the therapeutic uses, beneficial effects, and physiological responses of music.
  2. List the types of music therapy intervention.
  3. Describe art therapy interventions and settings in which they are used.
  4. List the goals, types of interventions, and benefits of dance and movement therapy.
  5. Describe the psychological, physiological, and spiritual benefits of laughter and therapeutic humor.
  6. Differentiate between the types of therapy animals, and describe three theories that explain the effects of animal-assisted therapy on health and well-being.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Therapeutic Massage and Bodywork Healing Therapies

Traditional Chinese Medicine: An Ancient Approach to Healing

Traditional Healing Systems

Description

Health care is evolving and integrating the healing therapies of alternative and allopathic medicine. Therapeutic massage and bodywork healing methods are being integrated in many health care organizations.

Objectives

  1. Describe cultural variations in bodywork.
  2. List the principles or techniques of contemporary and traditional bodywork.
  3. Describe the benefits of therapeutic massage.
  4. Explain the therapeutic massage modalities of Swedish massage, sports massage, neuromuscular massage, and Aston patterning.
  5. Describe the Eastern, meridian-based, and point therapies of acupressure, shiatsu, Jin Shin Jyutsu, and reflexology.
  6. Discuss the energy-based therapies of Reiki, Therapeutic Touch, and Healing Touch.
  7. Explain the emotional bodywork therapies of Rolfing and Hellerwork.
  8. Describe the manipulative therapies of chiropractic and osteopathy.
  9. Identify the cautions and contraindications for massage and bodywork.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is the oldest professional continuously practiced medicine in the world, with origins dating back more than 2,500 years. TCM emphasizes the holistic view of the human being and encompasses many different treatment modalities such as acupuncture, acupressure, herbal medicine, and Qigong. This course provides an overview of TCM and the philosophy of harmony and health.

Objectives

  1. Describe the differences between viewpoints in Western medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).
  2. Compare and contrast the concepts of yin and yang.
  3. Discuss the five elements of five elements theory and explain their characteristics.
  4. State the characteristics of the basic substances of qi, jing, blood, body fluids, and shen.
  5. Describe the role of the basic substances in the body.
  6. Identify the organs of the zang-fu system and describe their functions.
  7. Explain the meridian or channel system and its role in TCM.
  8. List the internal and external causes of disharmony according to TCM.
  9. Describe the four types of examinations used in TCM.
  10. Explain acupuncture, moxibustion, and cupping.
  11. Explain acupressure and herbalism.
  12. Explain Qigong, Tai Chi Chuan, and lifestyle modifications as used in TCM.

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2.50 Hours | 0.25 AOTA CEUs

$25.00

Description

Used by the majority of the world’s population, traditional healing systems include a diverse collection of philosophies, practices, spiritual and manual therapies, incorporating plant, animal, and/or mineral-based medicines. Most often used by indigenous persons determined to preserve, develop, and transmit their knowledge to future generations, traditional medicine is increasingly popular due to its accessibility and affordability, its holistic focus, and because of its emphasis on community and cultural values.

Objectives

  1. Discuss the role of traditional medicine in today’s health care environment
  2. Describe the major elements of Ayurvedic medicine.
  3. Explain the key characteristics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).
  4. Discuss the major healing philosophies of Native American healing.
  5. Describe the focus of South African healing traditions.
  6. Explain the major elements of curanderismo.
  7. Identify the role of peyote in Central and South American healing.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Treatment of Pain at the End of Life

Unani Medicine

Understanding Chiropractic Care

Description

Regardless of the cause, pain is a common symptom in clients who are near death. Health care providers must understand pain symptoms and prioritize the assessment and optimal treatment of pain in clients near death. They must be knowledgeable about alternative routes for analgesia, analgesic dosing, and when to make referrals to palliative care providers to assist in the management of pain. This course provides health care professionals with an overview of the key concepts related to effective pain management at the end of life.

Objectives

  1. Identify the types of pain found in clients near death.
  2. Describe the appropriate types of pain relief for clients near death.
  3. Explain why nonopiod and/or opioid analgesics would be used near death.
  4. Discuss how to determine which route of medication administration is appropriate for the terminally ill client.
  5. Describe the role of family caregivers in providing pain management at the end of life.
  6. Identify symptoms of distress at the end of life.
  7. Identify symptoms of pain at the end of life.
  8. Describe the role of hospice and palliative care providers at the end of life.
  9. Explain the use of a symptom relief kit.
  10. Identify barriers and facilitating factors for treating the symptoms of pain at the end of life.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00

Description

Unani medicine is an ancient medical system based on Greek origins. Officially recognized by the World Health Organization as one of several alternative traditional systems of medicine, it s a comprehensive medical system that provides preventive, curative, and rehabilitative healthcare to millions of patients throughout the world. Primarily practiced in the Eastern Mediterranean, Unani medicine is a sophisticated healing system that has profoundly influenced Western medicine.

Objectives

  1. Describe the origins of Unani medicine.
  2. Explain the fundamentals of Unani medicine, including the sets of naturals, the four elements, and the causes of disease.
  3. Identify diagnostic techniques used by Unani practitioners.
  4. Describe basic elements of health maintenance, prevention, and treatment in Unani medicine.
  5. Identify basic education components for Unani practitioners.

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1.50 Hours

$15.00

Description

Chiropractic is often considered a complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapy. Chiropractic care commonly uses spinal manipulation therapy as a main treatment modality to address back and neck pain, as well as pain in the joints of the arms or legs, and headaches. The goal is to correct alignment problems, ease pain, and support the body’s natural ability to heal itself.

Objectives

  1. Describe the scope of chiropractic practice.
  2. Identify the philosophies that are part of chiropractic practice.
  3. State key historical milestones in the national and international development of chiropractic care.
  4. List health conditions that are commonly treated with chiropractic care.
  5. State contraindications to chiropractic treatment.
  6. Describe education requirements for chiropractors practicing in the United States.

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1.00 Hours | 0.10 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Walk Your Stress Away

Wire Your Brain for Happiness

Workplace Stress

Description

Walking is the perfect exercise, as it can be accomplished almost anywhere, nearly everyone can do it, and minimal equipment is needed to participate. The benefits of walking include mental and physical wellness.

Objectives

  1. Describe guidelines for walking to improve health.
  2. Describe how walking helps reduce stress.
  3. List the health benefits of walking.
  4. Explain how to start and maintain a walking routine.
  5. Describe the meditation practices in Sufism.

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1.00 Hours | 1.20 AOTA CEUs

$10.00

Description

The hidden power of everyday positive experiences can change your brain and change your life. Everyone wants to be happy and healthy. By focusing on becoming happier and creating positive experiences, research suggests that we will experience increased energy, improved immune function, increased creativity, improved relationships, and increased productivity. Happiness results in a healthier brain, a more vibrant body, and a longer life.

Objectives

  1. Define happiness.
  2. Describe positive experiences and emotions.
  3. Discuss the relationship between happiness and experience-dependent neuroplasticity.
  4. Compare the determinants of happiness.
  5. Examine happiness assessment tools.
  6. Describe the practices that increase happiness and health.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

For most Americans today, the workplace is ever changing and is a major source of daily stress. As a result, the economic and personal health effects of workplace stress are at epidemic levels, making workplace stress one of the most important health challenges of the 21st century.

Objectives

  1. Describe the extent of workplace stress.
  2. Compare and contrast job stress and job burnout.
  3. Identify causes of job stress.
  4. Discuss the extent of workplace violence (including horizontal violence).
  5. Describe ways to reduce the incidence of workplace violence.
  6. Identify health effects of workplace stress.
  7. List ways to reduce workplace stress.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Yoga: An Integrative Practice for Life

Zoonoses: Can Your Pet Make You Sick?

Description

The practice of yoga is becoming increasingly popular as a way to relieve stress, live in harmony with nature, and enhance well-being of the mind and body. One reason for its growing popularity is that more many people are open to it and are using holistic approaches to manage their pressure-filled, fast-paced lives. Yoga provides an integrative, healthy way to connect mind, body, and spirit, resulting in improved physical, mental, and emotional health.

Objectives

  1. Describe the philosophical foundations of yoga.
  2. Explain the eight-limb path of yoga.
  3. Differentiate between the styles of yoga.
  4. Discuss Western yoga.
  5. Describe the benefits of yoga.
  6. Identify the contraindications and risks of yoga.
  7. Compare factors to consider when choosing a yoga class.
  8. Describe considerations for the safe practice of yoga for children and adolescents.
  9. Describe considerations for the safe practice of yoga for seniors.

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1.50 Hours | 0.15 AOTA CEUs

$15.00

Description

Pets and other animals can contribute to a healing environment with their companionship, assistance, sensory stimulation, need for exercise, sense of calmness, and level of acceptance that is often difficult to find from any other source. Yet many diseases can be spread from pets to people. These diseases, called zoonoses, can involve bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections. People can also infect pets, as well. Maintaining a healing environment for all includes the prevention of infections from our pets and other animals.

Objectives

  1. Define zoonoses.
  2. Describe dermatophytes and types of animals most likely to transmit them.
  3. Identify the four major categories of zoonoses as listed by the World Health Organization (WHO).
  4. Describe the causes, signs, symptoms, treatments of salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, cat scratch disease (CSD), leptospirosis, trematodosis, toxoplasmosis, rabies, avian influenza, dermatophytosis, and sporotrichosis.
  5. Describe the role of animals in each of the zoonoses categories.
  6. Identify common human diseases in which animals are not the source of transmission.
  7. Identify diseases spread from humans to animals.
  8. Explain methods of preventing zoonoses.

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2.00 Hours | 0.20 AOTA CEUs

$20.00